A Pictorial History

FOOTBALL PROGRAMMES

WEST HAM UNITED

Steve Marsh & Stuart Allen

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1960-61 Football League : First Division

WOLVERHAMPTON WANDERERS : Football League First Division

CHELSEA : Football League First Division

Stamford Bridge

2 - 3 (Dunmore, Grice)

10 September 1960

Att: 37,873

60_08_20 Wolves v. WHU 60_08_22 WHU v. Aston Villa 60_08_27 WHU v. Bolton Wanderers 60_08_29 Aston Villa v. WHU 60_09_03 Sheffield Wednesday v. WHU

Molineux

2 - 4 (Dick, Woosnam)

20 August 1960

Att: 37,266

Rhodes

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

A goal up in seven minutes against the Cup holders and League runners-up on their own ground was a splendid start to the season, and the large number of Hammers' fans in the 37,266 attendance had every hope of us pulling off the first sensation of the 1960-61 campaign. It could have been 2-0 in the 32nd minute had Mike Grice's shot gone into the net instead of rebounding into play off the post—and Wolves would have really been in trouble . . . unfortunately it was not so, and within a minute the homesters had forced a corner at the other end which resulted in a great header from Ron Flowers levelling the scores. This reprieve certainly revived the Cullis men, and the rampaging Flowers created something of a record for a wing-half by netting his club's first two goals of the season—the second being a 25-yard first-time drive three minutes after the interval as the ball ran loose from a home attack. Nevertheless, our lads were still very much in the game, and had Johnny Dick in the 54th minute converted a similar sort of chance that brought him our first goal we could have had Wolves worried again; however the ball rolled past the post and from then onwards the opposition got a decisive grip on the game. The issue was virtually settled after 68 minutes, Des Home's corner being pushed out to Peter Broadbent for the England inside-forward to pick his spot from 15 yards range; and Jim Murray hardly had to hurry when he tapped the ball in from one yard's range after it had slid off the bar from Norman Deeley's cross from the left-wing. The final goal came in the final minute, Phil Woosnam hitting home a loose ball from just inside the box. Six goals (four of them of a very good standard) and plenty of pretty football contributed to an exciting encounter that kept the spectators well on their toes. We had our chances and showed up very well in the first half-hour, but with Wolves recovering their poise after a shaky start eventually had to concede victory by a score fairly representative of the game. It would have been highly satisfactory to have brought back a point, but although our new-style tactics showed several Hammers to advantage, lapses at vital stages proved fatal to our hopes.

ASTON VILLA : Football League First Division

Upton Park

5 - 2 (Bond, Dick, Dunmore, Musgrove, Woosnam)

22 August 1960

Att: 28,959

Rhodes

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Both teams were unchanged after their opening fixture (the Villa having beaten Chelsea by 3-2 a couple of days earlier) and once again both featured in a high-scoring game. However, it was the turn of the Hammers to prove victorious on this occasion, and a 5-2 success came at the end of another 90-minute thriller watched by an attendance of 28,959. A general tightening-up and additional experience of our tactics brought more desirable results, and although the visitors equalised on one occasion and nearly levelled the scores at 3-3 during the second half we pulled through to eventually gain a comfortable margin. The game sparkled from the start and it took only 15 minutes for the scoring spree to commence. A very good combined movement between Phil Woosnam, Bobby Moore and Malcolm Musgrove ended with Woosnam lobbing home from twelve yards, but a couple of minutes later Pat Saward brought the ball downfield for Bobby Thomson to make it 1-1 from a rebound after his first shot had hit the post. Another two-in-two minutes spell just before the floodlights went on brought goals from Dave Dunmore (37 mins, after a solo run following a Musgrove - John Bond move) and John Dick (who shovelled in Musgrove's pass from a Dunmore opening). What looked like a shot at goal by Peter McParland was headed in by Gerry Kitchens three minutes later, and the teams went in after an exhausting half with the score 3-2 in our favour. A scramble on our line had hearts in the Hammers' mouths soon after the interval, but then a typical Bond drive from 30-yards (Woosnam set up the pass) virtually settled the issue with 32 minutes to go. Both sides came very near to scoring several times after that, but it was left to Musgrove to set the seal with a grand header two minutes from the end, Woosnara again providing the final pass. Actually the only forward not to score was Mike Grice, but he played a commendable part in our attacking movements and again had the mortification of seeing a grand shot rebound from the upright.

BOLTON WANDERERS : Football League First Division

60_09_05 WHU v. Manchester United

PETER SHEARING makes his Hammers debut against SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY at Hillsborough

60_09_10 Chelsea v. WHU 60_09_14 Manchester United v. WHU

MANCHESTER UNITED : Football League First Division

60_09_17 WHU v. Blackpool

BLACKPOOL : Football League First Division

Upton Park

2 - 1 (Dick, Musgrove)

27 August 1960

Att: 24,283

Rhodes

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

ASTON VILLA : Football League First Division

SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY : Football League First Division

MANCHESTER UNITED : Football League First Division

Villa Park

1 - 2 (Dunmore)

29 August 1960

Att: 32,098

Rhodes

Bond

Cantwell

Hurst

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Smillie

Musgrove

Hillsborough

0 - 1

3 September 1960

Att: 26,359

Shearing

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

2 - 1 (Brett, Musgrove)

5 September 1960

Att: 30,560

Shearing

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Brett

Musgrove

Old Trafford

1 - 6 (Brett)

14 September 1960

Att: 33,288

Shearing

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Woosnam

Dunmore

Brett

Musgrove

Upton Park

3 - 3 (Bond, Musgrove, Woodley)

17 September 1960

Att: 23,521

Shearing

Kirkup

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Woosnam

Bond

Dunmore

Musgrove

60_09_24 Everton v. WHU 60_09_26 WHU v. Charlton Athletic FLC1 60_10_01 WHU v. Blackburn Rovers 60_10_08 WHU v. Birmingham City 60_10_15 WBA v. WHU

MICK BEESLEY makes his Hammers debut against EVERTON at Goodison Park

EVERTON : Football League First Division

Goodison Park

1 - 4 (Beesley)

24 September 1960

Att: 46,291

Shearing

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Woosnam

Bond

Beesley

Musgrove

CHARLTON ATHLETIC : Football League Cup (First Round)

Upton Park

3 - 1 (Dick, Moore, Musgrove)

26 September 1960

Att: 12,496

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Cartwright

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

BLACKBURN ROVERS : Football League First Division

Upton Park

3 - 2 (Dick 2, Woosnam)

1 October 1960

Att: 17,519

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

BIRMINGHAM CITY : Football League First Division

Upton Park

4 - 3 (Grice 2, Dunmore, Musgrove)

8 October 1960

Att: 15,954

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

WEST BROMWICH ALBION : Football League First Division

The Hawthorns

0 - 1

15 October 1960

Att: 22,009

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

60_10_22 WHU v. Preston North End

PRESTON NORTH END : Football League First Division

RON BOYCE makes his Hammers debut against PRESTON NORTH END at Upton Park

60_10_24 Darlington v. WHU FLC2

DARLINGTON : Football League Cup (Second Round)

60_10_29 Fulham v. WHU

FULHAM : Football League First Division

60_11_05 WHU v. Arsenal

ARSENAL : Football League First Division

60_11_12 Manchester City v. WHU

MANCHESTER CITY : Football League First Division

60_11_19 WHU v. Nottingham Forest 60_11_26 Burnley v. WHU Post

Turf Moor

26 November 1960

60_12_03 WHU v. Cardiff City 60_12_10 Newcastle United v. WHU 60_12_17 WHU v. Wolves 60_12_24 Tottenham Hotspur v. WHU 60_12_26 WHU v. Tottenham Hotspur 60_12_31 Bolton Wanderers v. WHU

NOTTINGHAM FOREST : Football League First Division

BURNLEY : Football League First Division

CARDIFF CITY : Football League First Division

NEWCASTLE UNITED : Football League First Division

WOLVERHAMPTON WANDERERS : Football League First Division

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR : Football League First Division

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR : Football League First Division

BOLTON WANDERERS : Football League First Division

Manager: Ted Fenton / Ron Greenwood

CONTINUE 2

Bill Jenkins arrives

A further addition has been made to the training-staff at Upton Park by the full-time appointment of Bill Jenkins as physiotherapist-trainer to the Hammers; he will commence his duties on Thursday next. 1st September and will accompany the First XI at its matches. Bill was selected from a large number of applicants, among the factors influencing our decision being his previous services with Clapton and Walthamstow Avenue (for the past two seasons).

 

Two Hammers made their first appearance of the season in this game, Geoff Hurst coming in for Andy Malcolm (who received a thigh injury against Bolton) and Andy Smillie taking over from John Dick. Villa fielded the same XI as that which lost here 5-2 on the previous Monday.

An 18th-minute goal for the Hammers was the result of a nine-man movement, Andy Smillie's strong shot being parried by Sims to leave Dave Dunmore an easy chance. We kept this lead until half-an-hour from the end by more brilliant play, and with a little more punch up front could have made the game safe. However, a clever MacEwan - McParland move enabled Kitchens to equalise (thus keeping his record of scoring in every game to date this season) and this put fresh heart into the Midlanders. Nevertheless, it looked as if we were to gain a deserved point until 90 seconds from time when Villa got a free-kick award on their left flank; over came the ball—and Ron Wylie's lob was converted by Bobby Thomson to snatch a somewhat fortunate victory.

We gained a 2-1 victory with a last-minute lob from John Dick, but could well appreciate that the Trotters had a feeling of being "robbed ' of a point which they perhaps deserved from a somewhat disappointing game. We say " disappointing " because the contest faded into a drab second-half after a fairly good opening 45 minutes during which Malcolm Musgrove scored with a fierce angled drive (13 mins) and Peter Deakin equalised with a half-hit shot from close range (25 mins).

However, it is only right to point out that we also had what appeared to be a good goal by Dave Dunmore disallowed, the linesman's offside decision against another of our players cancelling the referee's original award, A goal then could well have put us on the road to a more convincing margin, but it was not to be. The failure of the visiting forwards to offer little more than long-range shooting as their contribution to their side's efforts did not help from the entertainment viewpoint, but our own defence could be complimented inasmuch as they kept their opponents at bay - although the Wanderers' shooting was so inaccurate that they did not look likely to score even from closer in.

Aston Villa (H)

Malcolm Musgrove                                                        John Dick

Bolton (H)

Hopkinson saves from Malcolm Musgrove's fierce drive as John Dick comes in

A 37,873 attendance (the third highest of the day) had nothing but praise for this match, which was played in an excellent sporting spirit between teams that fought a typical "local derby duel (without the "traditional" infringements'.). It was a game m which luck played i part, but fortune could never be credited with the brilliant display given by Peter Bonetti in the Chelsea goal; his goalkeepmg was terrific, and the spontaneous applause from our players was adequate comment upon a performance that was almost " out of this world." We succeeded m obtaining a photograph of Bonetti being beaten by a Dave Dunmore drive in the 26th minute (from Ron Brett's pass), but it was only one of the two occasions when this 19-year-old had to admit defeat; the other was when Mike Grice connected with a rebound after the 'keeper had parried Malcolm Musgrove's drive on to the bar 13 minutes from time.

Chelsea had made a flying start with a goal by Frank Blunstone in the first minute from a cross-pass by Charlie Livesey, and five minutes after our equaliser they went ahead with a Jimmy Greaves goal. The Blues survived a tremendous attacking spell soon after the interval, but oroke away for Livesey to score with an angled shot that made it 3-1 after 73 minutes. But then... it was Bonetti again!

A single goal by John Fantham five minutes after the interval decided this game in favour of the Wednesday whose attack could not otherwise penetrate a clever defence which kept the opposition from giving a full-scale test to Peter Shearing. The ex-Hendon amateur 'keeper was playing his first League game, and although he did everything that was asked of him Peter will agree that it could have been more difficult.

The Owls' manager Harry Catterick expressed the view that 4-2-4 is a negative type of soccer, but his players certainly gave no owl-like display of wisdom in their endeavours to overcome it, and consequently the game did show some lack of sparkle ; this was supplemented by a failure among our own forwards to make the most of their chances, although Phil Woosnam brought out the best in England goalkeeper Ron Springett when the home custodian just managed to push his drive over the bar.

The contrast between this game and that of two days earlier was shown by the enthusiasm of an attendance of nearly 30,000 who applauded the skill of both sides on a fine evening which brought soccer in keeping with the conditions.

We made a late change in our side (bringing in Ron Brett for the injured John Dick) while the United also made one alteration at centre-half in an endeavour to plug the gap exploited by Bobby Smith of the Spurs on the previous Saturday. Our move paid an almost immediate dividend, for Brett converted Mike Grice's centre in the 18th minute. A first-timer by Albert Quixall put the visitors on level terms almost on the stroke of half-time, but ten minutes after the interval we gained a winning lead by what was described by one writer as a" pantomime goal";  we considered it a rather apt description inasmuch that it was an "off-Woosnam" shot by John Bond that gave Malcolm Musgrove an easy scoring chance, but it was not entirely fair to add that it was that goal which beat the visitors. We could reasonably point to the fact that we hit the woodwork three times with Harry Gregg well beaten, and although Peter Shearing gave a most encouraging display "between the sticks" for the Hammers his counterpart was none the less responsible for a thrilling display at the other end.

Shearing

Bond

Cantwell

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Brett

Musgrove

Our return game with the United brought plenty of excitement for the 33,288 attendance, seven goals being scored in a match that equalled our earlier meeting as far as good soccer was concerned. However, the Mancunians proved to be the better finishers on this occasion and they ended the game 6-1 winners.

In the opening spell we went very close to scoring, but the tide started to turn against us in the 20th minute when Dennis Viollet's shot cannoned off Ken Brown's boot for the first goal. The same forward made it 2-0 seven minutes later with a 20-yard drive, but we reduced the arrears on the stroke of half-time through Ron Brett. A combined move two minutes after the interval ended with Bobby Charlton scoring and this was followed by further goals from Charlton and Albert Scanlon. Albert Quixall converted a penalty four minutes from time.

So it terminated for the statistical record with a convincing margin in favour of the opposition. From our side we gained consolation by a typical report of the game which said: "Yet Ted Fenton's footballers were never five goals worse than United and they never stopped playing football."

We took a point from this game which despite half-a-dozen goals was not an entirely satisfactory one from the spectators' viewpoint. The 23,521 attendance was certainly not completely disappointed in their hopes of seeing some typical Stanley Matthews' skill, and they had plenty of deserved praise for the efforts of Bobby Moore who came out of his duels with the "Maestro" with flying colours. But we just couldn't seem to make the grade, and although we held the lead three times the Seasiders managed to end with what for them was indeed a welcome draw after five successive defeats..

A slow-moving goalkeeper allowed a left-foot John Bond shot to find the net after nine minutes to put us ahead, but Ray Charnley (a hardworking centre-forward) headed in to make it 1-1 after 20 minutes. The entire Blackpool defence watched Derek Woodley's centre pass right across the goalmouth for Malcolm Musgrove to score from close in (38 minutes) and we went in 2-1 up at the interval and hopeful of further goals. However, a quickly-taken free-kick bv Matthews found Charnley in the right spot for another equaliser after 62 minutes; nevertheless we seemed to have again made the points our own when Derek Woodley scored his first goal of the season from Phil Woosnam's pass with but 13 minutes to go. But then ... a fatal hesitation as goalkeeper Waiters booted a clearance almost into our penalty-area, and an easy goal by Mudie three minutes from time ended our hopes of victory.

The very successful Everton team maintained its 100 per cent home record for the 1960-61 season before an attendance of 46,291  who again saw the Hammers play plenty of soccer but provide little finish to their movements. We included 18-year-old Michael Beesley in our League side for the first time, and he celebrated his debut by heading home Malcolm Musgrove's centre in the tenth minute to equalise Micky Lill's opening goal from a 20-yard drive which had come after five minutes' play. Unfortunately just before half-time Mick collided with Jim Gabriel and both went off to have stitches inserted in head-cuts (although they resumed after the interval); nevertheless Mick had already shown his ability, and was always seeking opportunities. Meanwhile the Toffeemen had quickly regained their advantage, for after 13 minutes a speculative 20-yard effort by Tommy Ring made it 2-1, We made sporadic raids after that, but it was no real surprise when a third goal came for the homesters as Roy Vernon pounced on Ring's quick throw-in after 66 minutes' play. This disheartened several of the Hammers, and Vernon got another ten minutes later to completely settle the issue.

With Noel Cantwell injured, Phil Woosnam on International duty for Wales two days later and Mike Beesley out of action we made changes that resulted in our line-up consisting of: Rhodes; Bond, Lyall ; Malcolm, Brown, Moore ; Woodley, Cartwright, Dunmore, Dick. Musgrove. This was John Dick's first appearance since Sept. 3rd when he was injured. The Robins (who wore dark blue jerseys on this occasion owing to a normal colour-clash!) made us go all out for the first hour, and it was not until Bobby Moore crashed home a grand shot from all of 25 yards in the 65th minute that we felt fairly comfortably placed to qualify for the next round (although even then the visitors made several threats to our goal). In fact it was the opposition that netted the first goal, Stuart Leary taking advantage of defensive hesitation to conclude a solo effort. However, this early reverse proved a "shot in the arm" to our XI, and John Dick levelled the score with a similar effort to Leary's from a good through ball. Four minutes after the interval Malcolm Musgrove intercepted a back pass to net one from close range and Moore then made the final tally 3-1.

If a cat has nine lives it could well be said that both goals in this game had ninety-nine lives ; as one sports writer in the press room put it after the game, "The score might well have been 9-9 or any permutation up to that." As it happened we scored three times to the Rovers' two and thus gained a very welcome pair of points. Morning rain had not only made the ground slippery but it also had its effect on the attendance, this being down to 17,519. However, those who were present certainly had their share of excitement, with defenders kicking, heading and chesting the ball off the goal-line when goalkeepers were completely beaten several times. Nevertheless, one such particular kick was just too late, and an observant linesman had no hesitation ii awarding a goal despite an opposing defender booting out Phil Woosnam's first-time angled drive in the 26th minute. That goal gave us the lead which we had tried so hard to gain after scores by Alex McLeod and John Dick. McLeod headed home a back header from Derek Dougan following a long throw-in seven minutes from the start, and Dick's goal also came when his head met Phil Woosnam's lob to beat the visiting 'keeper in the 21st minute. A miskick that left Eddie Thomas to sidefoot the ball home gave the Rovers a 66th minute equaliser, but with only eight minutes to go Dick notched his fifth League goal this season from Malcolm Musgrove's pass to put us finally ahead. There were still several frustrating periods for Hammers' supporters in this game, but nevertheless our XI showed touches of soccer which proved that with perseverance they can regain that delightful team-work which made them such a threat in that first 18 months back in Division I. We were, of course, without the services and steadying influence of skipper Noel Cant-well (still absent through injury), but after a somewhat hesitant start deputy left-back John Lyall came into h's own during the closing stages in his first League game of the season.

The Boleyn Ground faithful were treated to a goal fest when Birmingham City visited in October 1960. A Mike Grice double and goals from Malcolm Musgrove and Dave Dunmore secured a thrilling win as the Hammers moved up to 12th in the league. Grice's brace was half of his haul for the season as he netted just twice more. The Hammers went onto finish the season in 16th position, three places above their opponents.

Noel Cantwell's injury had not responded to  treatment for him  to resume in our line-up and John Lyall therefore continued in an unchanged team for this fixture. Unfortunately it did not look like the same team that had beaten Birmingham City on the previous Saturday, for although Phil Woosnam again provided plenty of spectator-entertainment his colleagues could not capitalise on many of the chances offered. The Albion likewise failed to make the most of the opportunities offered by the similar work of Ronnie Allen, although they had another star in veteran Joe Kennedy whose anticipation and tackling was outstanding. The outcome was that the 22,009 spectators were in short supply of thrills, and it was left to wing-half Bobby Robson to settle the issue seven minutes after the interval with a 25-yard drive that brought the only goal of the game.

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Boyce

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

5 - 2 (Musgrove 3, Bond, Dick)

22 October 1960

Att: 16,295

Feethams Ground

2 - 3 (Dick, Dunmore)

24 October 1960

Att: 16,911

Our first-ever Cup meeting with Darlington ended in a 3-2 victory for the north-easterners before a 16,911 attendance (only a little over 2,000 short of the ground record). Defensive errors on the part of the Hammers largely accounted for this " upset," but in fairness to the Fourth Divisioners it should be said that they took their opportunities in a very enthusiastic manner. However, an early injury to Malcolm Musgrove undoubtedly had a great effect on the mobility of our forward-line and the attack did not function as smoothly as it had done a couple of days earlier. Twenty seconds after the kick-off left-half Ray Spencer ran on to a pass from Lance Robson to crack home the ball from 20 yards, and for the next twenty minutes we were hard pressed. We recovered our poise to equalise when Dave Dunmore chased a long ball for about 40 yards to make it 1-1, but Darlington came back after the interval to gain a 3-1 lead; outside-right Joe Rayment scored at the second attempt when his shot from outside-left Keith Morton's pass was parried (53 mins.). and Robson intercepted a back pass eleven minutes later to give his side a commanding lead. John Dick reduced our arrears, but the 'Tons held on to pass into the Third Round. We were naturally disappointed, but at the same time congratulate Darlington on a victory which ranks with their 4-1 F.A. Cup win over Chelsea three seasons ago. We wish them even- success for further progress in the competition.

The first hour of this game was fairly evenly contested, the score being level at 2-2 after each team had netted twice in the opening 30 minutes. Both sides opened their account with a long-range shot, Malcolm Musgrove beating Else from fully 35 yards with a real "blaster" in the fifth minute and Tommy Thompson equalising with a drive from 25 yards five minutes later. John Bond made it 2-1 from the penalty-spot when Musgrove was fouled in the 20th minute, but Thompson ran on to a through ball to get his second tally. Sixty-eight minutes had passed when John Dick headed home Mike Grice's cross pass and then Musgrove came along with a couple of typical late efforts to complete his first Football League hat-trick and put us well ahead by the final whistle. Considering the heavy conditions the game was played at a fast rate, and there were enough goals and near-misses to please the 16,287 attendance that braved adverse weather conditions. They were all keen to see 17-year-old Ron Boyce make his League debut, and we were pleased that Ron made a promising showing on this auspicious occasion.

Although John Bond, Brian Rhodes and Phil Woosnam had recovered from injuries received at Darlington on the previous Monday, Malcolm Musgrove's ankle had not recovered sufficiently for him to play in this alt-London encounter. Consequently Mike Grice crossed to take Mai's place on the left-wing and Derek Woodley had his fourth League game of the season at outside-right. In damp conditions Fulham started as if they intended to run up a big score. However, they found themselves against a defence which covered splendidly, and time and again they were unable to get in a shot. But at the other end it was a different story, and with the Cottagers' rearguard wide open on several occasions it was surprising that Dave Dunmore was the only Hammer to find the net; Dave ran for about 30 yards through an unguarded middle to collect Andy Malcolm's pass and shoot past the advancing Tony Macedo in the tenth minute. We could well have added another two or three goals to this before Fulham equalised, but Macedo made some good saves on the occasions when our shots were on target and undoubtedly contributed much to his team's collecting a point. Graham Leggat's equaliser came two minutes before half-time when he hit a ground shot from 25 yards into the far corner of the goal; the rest of the opposition's efforts were also confined mostly to long-range shots and headers from centres, and there was no doubt that much of Johnny Haynes' good work went to waste through the combined inefficiency of his colleagues and the efficiency of his opponents. From our view it was most pleasing to gain our first away League point since November 14th of last year: and the considerable contingent of Hammers' supporters among the 20,809 gate helped to encourage their favourites to break a run which we were glad to end.

We celebrated Guy Fawkes' Day by "burning up" Arsenal to a tune of 6-0. This was one goal short of our record First Division victory against them in 1927, but we could well have set a new mark but for the great work of Jack Kelsey ; he had no chance with any of our half-dozen successful shots, but pulled off saves and cut out cross-balls which could have led to many more. It was a sad reflection on the Gunners' line-up that Kelsey was their sole star, for even in defeat most teams have more than one player worthy of mention. However, the all-round superiority of our XI more than overshadowed the North Londoners and we had stars in plenty in this game. Our rearguard gained full marks, but it should be borne in mind that the covering of the other four members afforded our wing-halves the opportunity to take a very large part in attack; this was finally underlined by  Andy Malcolm's grand goal (his first in Division I). Of the forwards the scoring honours undoubtedly went to Dave Dun-more who notched his initial hat-trick in the claret-and-blue. His first was a "gift" set up by a defensive error, but he took the other two in grand style and was a constant threat. Sometimes less spectacular but nevertheless most effective was Phil Woosnam (who "made" goals before getting one of his own), while John Dick's goal was also the reward for a lot of hard work. A grand win, and well worthy of the applause which greeted our team as it left the field.

Malcolm Musgrove returned to our line-up after missing two matches through injury, and he came through successfully. Mai had to switch positions with Phil Woosnam after ten minutes' play when our inside-right received an ankle-knock that necessitated his moving to the wing for a spell; the City were one up then, Dennis Law beginning a move which ended with Colin Barlow scoring from an angle. However, Phil recovered to resume at inside-right and helped to open up the game. The outcome was a deserved equaliser in the 38th minute when Dave Dunmore beautifully headed home Mike Grice's centre, and just before the interval came another goal when Grice converted after his first shot had been parried.

That interval lead put us really on top and we very nearly added to it after the resumption. But although we missed that opportunity the City made just as costly a lapse at the other end soon afterwards. The Mancunians were not deterred by this and made many efforts to equalise, but against a resolute rearguard they came to naught—and the points were ours! Unfortunately a small section of the 33,751 behind our goal let their disappointment get the better of them in the second half, but the majority gave praise to our skill in registering City's first home defeat of the season.

A quotation from one report of this game reads: " Judging by their recent programme admonitions, West Ham will explain away this defeat by blaming the newspapers." Now, you know, that is rather unfair, for we do endeavour to be factual in our reports of games and our recent articles discussing relationships with certain sections of the press have never criticised match reports - only those articles referring untruly to other matters.

The simple explanation for this 2-4 reverse on our own ground at the hands of foot-of-the-table Forest can, in our opinion, be summed up by one word—complacency. Having thrashed Arsenal here a fortnight earlier, and beaten Manchester City at Maine Road on the following Saturday it appeared right from the start that some of our team adopted an " it's easy " attitude towards the opposition.

Despite the visitors' opening pressure this false sense of security was perhaps accentuated by an " own goal " in our favour 19 minutes after the start, and although the Midlanders equalised after what appeared to be an offside decision in our favour the scoring of a good goal by Dave Dunrnore restored our lead and morale rather quickly. Nevertheless this was against the run of the play, and we could not complain about the Forest equalising on the stroke of half-time even if Billy Gray's 30-yard speculative shot led to a "soft" goal. This rather unexpected success not only spurred the opposition but it obviously dimmed our own lads' enthusiasm, and with the 18-year-old Peter Grummitt "playing a blinder" between the sticks the Nottingham club well-earned their victory through further tallies by Le Flem (47 mins) and Vowden (61 mins).

Under appalling conditions on a mud-bound pitch slashed by drenching rain from start to finish, the two teams combined to provide an entertaining 90 minutes for the 14,000 spectators who braved the elements. It was to be expected that some allowance would be made by the referee for the ground conditions when it came to tackling, having in mind the slippery conditions underfoot; but there was no doubt in the minds of a large number present that there were occasions when some decisions were difficult to understand. Nevertheless, despite this the two XI's put everything they had in the game, and there was some excellent soccer interspersed with thrilling goalmouth episodes. It took 35 minutes of hard pressing before we got our first goal, this coming from Malcolm Mus-grove's cross shot into the far corner of the net as the opposing 'keeper came out of his goal. The second followed a quickly-taken free-kick that ended with Mike Grice making the pass for Dave Dunmore to score four minutes after half-time. "The Bluebirds came near to scoring several times, but found Brian Rhodes in splendid form. He made one particularly fine save from Watkins' free-kick, punching the ball over the bar in spectacular one-handed fashion.

With only 19 minutes to go to the final whistle our unchanged team looked like recording their second away win of the season, and had the possibility of equalling or passing our record away score of six goals in a League match. Unfortunately a tendency to ease off combined with a " neck-or-nothing " Magpies' rally brought the homesters three goals in a six-minute period, and caused a breath-taking five minutes finale for the 20,106 spectators.

The Novocastrians deserve every praise for their determined efforts in these closing stages, but they readily admitted that we gave them the run-around prior to their comeback. Playing on his " home-town " doorstep Malcolm Musgrove provided the locals with plenty of entertainment in the first half; he scored our first goal in the fourth minute after Phil Woosnam had beautifully engineered an opening, dribbling the ball in after his first shot was blocked ; Mai was also responsible for our second goal in the 20th minute, his hard drive being diverted into the net by McMichael. White had equalised in the fifth minute, but after that Garrow played an almost lone hand in the first half.

Ten minutes after the change-over Dave Dunmore took a long pass from Musgrove to make it 3-1, and when Woosnam was brought down in the 65th minute John Bond scored from the Penalty-spot White got his second a minute later, but in another five it looked all over as John Dick put us 5-2 up. Many spectators left the ground at this time, but when they read the match reports they most certainly regretted their hastiness and petulance ; McGuigan headed in Mitchell's centre (79 mins), Bell hit a beauty (84 mins) and Mitchell got the equaliser to leave that final five minutes of a most exciting encounter.

SECOND-HALF

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Grice

Craven Cottage

1 - 1 (Dunmore)

29 October 1960

Att: 20,949

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Woodley

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Grice

Upton Park

6 - 0 (Dunmore 3, Dick, Woosnam, Malcolm)

5 November 1960

Att: 29,275

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Maine Road

2 -1 (Dunmore, Grice)

12 November 1960

Att: 33,751

Rhodes

Kirkup

Bond

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

2 - 4 (Dunmore, Palmer [og])

19 November 1960

Att: 21,047

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

2 - 0 (Dunmore, Musgrove)

3 December 1960

Att: 13,967

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

St James' Park

5 - 5 (Bond[pen], Dick, Dunmore, Musgrove, McMichael [og])

10 December 1960

Att: 20,106

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

5 - 0 (Dunmore 2, Dick, Moore, Musgrove)

17 December 1960

Att: 22,336

The injury which Geoff Sidebottom received in the League match here last Saturday week brought to an abrupt end the crescendo of enthusiasm which was greeting our increasing margin of superiority of a well-defeated Wolves' side. Fortunately the visiting goalkeeper was not so severely injured as was first believed, and it is to be hoped that he will not be kept out of action for a long period; but we did not know that at the time, and the incident cast a shadow over the last 40 minutes that made it a pale sequel to the tremendous prelude that had gone before. There was no denying that our team had given the Wanderers the "run around" during that first 50 minutes, and it is a general opinion that a continuance of the play which built up a 3-0 lead would have still brought victory by a similar margin to the 5-0 score which eventually resulted. The complete change which came over the game was undoubtedlv disappointing to the 22,336 attendance, but what had gone before contained as much excitement as is often encountered in ninety minutes of a normal game. It took only four minutes for us to lead, and the television cameras recorded a goal which had to be seen to be believed; Phil Woosnam, John Dick, Malcolm Musgrove and Mike Grice all took part in the move which ended in Musgrove diving full length to head home, and to quote one report: "... nowhere on the Continent or in South America could any team of stars produce a better goal than this one." Dun-more's first-time conversion of a short pass from nearly 30 yards in the 38th minute was also well worthy of remembrance and Bobby Moore's solo five minutes after the interval was another example of opportunism bringing his reward. Dunmore got his second with a nicely-placed shot before Dick had another solo run to end the scoring, but these last two tallies merely accentuated that our team can produce play that ranks them among the best sides in the country.

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Moore

Grice

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

White Hart Lane

0 - 2

24 December 1960

Att: 54,930

Nearly 90,000 spectators - 54,930 at White Hart Lane and 34,481 at Upton Park - saw our "local derby" duels with the Spurs during the Christmas holidays. The North Londoners' "Christmas box" to the Hammers was five goals; unfortunately we were not able to return this in even a minor way, so the Lilywhiles took their own "Xmas gift" in the shape of four points. We think they earned them, and have no hesitation in giving them pride of place as the best team we have met this season. Of the two games, we consider that the one at White Hart Lane was the better - not because we lost by a smaller margin but because the Hammers' play in general appeared more likely to earn some spoils. A headed goal by John White in the 24th minute had given (he homes'ers the lead but thev underwent many anxious moments in the space of the next hour! Indeed had not Bill Brown made a " save of the season " from Dave Dun-more after the ex-Spur had rammed back first-time a topped goal-kick there could well have resulted the first home defeat of the season for the League leaders ; but it was not to be, and the ten-men opnosition (Cliff Jones had hobbled off injured soon after the interval) not only stilled us off but even attacked to make the issue safe with a Terry Dyson counter 90 seconds from time.

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Hurst

Smillie

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

Upton Park

0 - 3

26 December 1960

Att: 34,351

For the return game the teams were unchanged except that Terry Medwin and John Hollowbread replaced the injured Jones and Brown. But surprisingly enough the exchanges this time were even more in favour of the Lilywhites, and they merited the 3-0 margin of victory to set the seal on their performance. A little bit of luck put them one up through an "own goal" after 24 minutes, and they made it two when Allen made the most of his opportunity a couple of minutes before the interval. Inspired by "Bubbles" our attack again hammered away after the resumption, but with Hollowbread stemming the gap in a truly fine "reserve" display we again failed to add the final touch ; inevitably, almost, the ball found its way to the other end - and White hit it home via an upright to administer the coup de grace. No recriminations from Upton Park - the better team won - but nevertheless, "Congratulations, Hammers" We would have beaten plenty of other teams on this form - but not the "Super Spurs of 1960"

For the match at Burnden Park we rested Mike Grice and Bobby Moore and brought in Geoff Hurst and Andy Smillie in their places. The line-ups were Hurst gave a very good performance in his second appearance in our First Team colours this season, and helped Phil Woosnam to make the opening that brought our goal after 20 minutes' play, Malcolm Musgrove finishing with a shot as he cut in from the left. Soon afterwards our left-half was again in the picture when he hit a post with a good drive, and the Wanderers looked really in trouble. Then came a "transformation scene." With but seven minutes to go before half-time Dennis Stevens nipped in to beat the offside trap as the ball came off one of our defence. Four minutes later it was 2-1, Billy McAdams seizing on a faulty clearance to pile-drive it home, and ten minutes after the resumption it went to 3-1 as Brian Birch's centre was diverted into our net. With their tails up the Wanderers held on to this somewhat fortunately gained advantage, and the 15,931 attendance showed great delight by cheering the Trotters to a rather unexpected victory that they badly needed in their precarious position.

Rhodes

Bond

Lyall

Malcolm

Brown

Hurst

Smillie

Woosnam

Dunmore

Dick

Musgrove

 

Burnden Park

1 - 3 (Musgrove)

31 December 1960

Att: 15,931

60_12_24 Tottenham Hotspur v. WHU

Image courtesy of Richard Miller

60_09_26 WHU v. Charlton Athletic

Image courtesy of Richard Miller

60_09_17 WHU v. Blackpool

Image courtesy of Richard Miller

The first few weeks of the season fell into a familiar pattern of winning at home but losing away. A 4-2 defeat at Wolverhampton was followed by a good 5-2 home win against Aston Villa. The trend continued with a 2-1 win over Manchester United at Upton Park but a 6-1 defeat in the return a fortnight later. A new competition, the Football League Cup, was born and the Hammers beat Charlton 3-1 at home in the inaugural match. The next round brought a trip to Fourth Division Darlington and again a poor display in away games saw the Hammers beaten 3–2.

At home the goals were flowing as winger Mike Grice scored twice against Blackburn Rovers in a 4-3 win and a hat-trick from Malcolm Musgrove came in a 5-2 victory against Preston North End. London rivals Arsenal were next to face the home onslaught and Dave Dunmore scored a hat-trick in a 6-0 win. Now in fine form, the Hammers won their first away game when beating Manchester City 2-1 at Maine Road. In an amazing game at Newcastle, West Ham were leading 5-2 with eleven minutes remaining only to concede three goals and end up drawing 5-5.

Stoke City were the visitors in the FA Cup and after drawing 2-2 they won the replay 1–0 at their Victoria Ground. The away results were dreadful, with heavy defeats at Blackpool (3-0), Preston (4-0) and Blackburn (4-1). Finally, following a 5-1 defeat at Leicester City, manager Ted Fenton was relieved of his duties and Ron Greenwood became the new manager. The Hammers finished sixteenth in the league, with only one away win on their travels.

MATCH POSTPONED

Unfit Pitch : rearranged for 18 April 1961

2 October 1960

PHIL BRIGNULL (1979) Born this day Stratford, London

 

A useful defender whose First XI opportunities were extremely limited. His sole appearance in the senior side was made as substitute against Cardiff City in a Second Division match at Ninian Park 11 May 1979 which finished 0-0. Transferred to A.F.C. Bournemouth in 1981, where his cousin, former Chelsea star David Webb, was then assistant manager, later moved to Wrexham and then slipped into non-League football.

28 September 1960

PHIL WOOSNAM 5th WALES cap

 

REPUBLIC OF IRELAND International Friendly Dalymount Park, Dublin 3-2.

Wales Ireland 1960 BRIGNULL  Phil & Steve BRIGNULL Phil

22 October 1960

PHIL WOOSNAM 6th WALES cap

 

SCOTLAND Home Championship Ninian Park, Cardiff 2-0.

Wales Scotland 1960

2 November 1960

BOBBY MOORE makes his ENGLAND Under-23 debut

 

ITALY International Friendly St James’ Park, Newcastle 1-1

6 November 1960

NOEL CANTWELL 17th REPUBLIC of IRELAND cap

 

NORWAY International Friendly Dalymount Park, Dublin 3-1

Ireland Norway 1960

23 November 1960

PHIL WOOSNAM 7th WALES cap

 

ENGLAND Home Championship Wembley Stadium, London 1-5

England v. Wales 1960

4th December 1960

STEVE WHITTON (1983-1986) Born this day Plaistow, London

 

Although he was born in the East End of London and played for Newham Boys, Steve decided he would have a better chance of advancement with Coventry City than a London club, signing apprentice for the Midlanders in April 1977. Signed as a full pro the following year, he duly made his First Division debut against Tottenham Hotspur in 1979. A flank man of great power and pace, he really came into his own in the 1982-83 campaign, and was the Highfield Road club's top scorer with 12 goals in 38 League matches. He signed for Hammers on 10 July 1983 for £200,000, making his First XI bow along with Steve Walford in the 4-0 triumph against Birmingham City on the 27 August 1983. Had a loan period to Birmingham City during the 1985-86 season, before making a more permanent move at the end of the same season. Transferred to Sheffield Wednesday in 1989 he later played in the the Swedish league with Allsvenskan as well as the First Division in Hong Kong before teaming up with former Hammers boss John Lyall at Ipswich Town. In 1994 he joined Colchester United where he made 116 appearances. In a playing career spanning 20 years (1978–1998), Whitton made more than 450 league appearances before being forced to

retire with injury. Became assistant manager at Colchester and went on to manage the Essex club until he left by mutual consent in early 2003.

WHITTON Steve