A Pictorial History

FOOTBALL PROGRAMMES

WEST HAM UNITED

Steve Marsh & Stuart Allen

Copyright © 2019 All rights reserved

theyflysohigh logo SS Prague ship

1929-30 Friendlies

PRACTICE MATCH : Reds v. Blues

PRACTICE MATCH : Reds v. Blues

Upton Park

? - ?

17 August 1929

Upton Park

? - ?

24 August 1929

It was very gratifying to find that the number of spectators here well exceeded that for the corresponding match last season. Today's gate receipts go to local charities and will be well satisfied.

Unfortunately, the rain somewhat spoilt things. Besides soaking those in the uncovered parts of the ground, at times it made the ball a little difficult to control, for it shot off from the wet grass at very funny angles, whilst our playing pitch (a thing of beauty at the commencement of the game) looked a little worse for the wear when the final whistle blew.

SLUG Programme

West Ham United in Holland, Denmark and Sweden 1930

Recorded by Mr A.C. DAVIS  (Director)

SATURDAY, JUNE 14th.

Leaving Helsingborg, Sweden, by train ferry at 6.30 a.m., with the sun shining brilliantly, we arrived at Elsinore, Denmark, just before 7 o'clock and entrained for Copenhagen, where we arrived at 8.30. Breakfast was served in the station restaurant and a very hurried shopping expedition was made by several of the party.

At 10 a.m. we left Copenhagen. About 12 noon, our second train ferry trip was taken from Osteburg, then on to Gedser, where the ferry carries the train from Denmark to Germany. The crossing of the Baltic Sea occupies two hours. Lunch was served on the ferry and at four p.m. we left Warnmunde for Hamburg, where we arrived at 8.15 p.m.

Having three hours to spare before the departure of the night express, an opportunity was taken to make a short tour along the banks of the River Alster and visit our old friend, H. Engels at the Palast Hotel. At 11.30 we took possession of the berths in the sleeping car and were soon in bed.

29_08_17 Practice Match 29_08_24 Practice Match 30_02_15 St Albans v. WHU 30_04_02 Folkestone v. WHU

DAGENHAM TOWN : Opening of Ground

Away

0 - 0

31 August 1929

THAMES

Away

4 - 1 (Campbell, Moran, Pollard, Robson)

5 September 1929

ST ALBANS

Away

3 - 2 (Evans 2, Pollard)

14 February 1930

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

FOLKESTONE

Away

5 - 3 (Barter 3, Ball, Harris)

2 April 1930

GRAYS THURROCK

Away

4 - 1 (Barter 2, Campbell 2)

18 September 1929

ILFORD v. WALTHAMSTOW : London Amateur Senior Cup (Final)

Upton Park

4 - 1

10 May 1930

SLUG Programme

Other Matches Played at the Boleyn Ground

CLAPTON ORIENT : London Professional Charity Cup

Upton Park

6 - 2 (Watson 3, Earle 2, Ruffell)

30 September 1929

ILFORD v. BOURNEMOUTH GASWORKS ATHLETIC : Amateur Cup Final

Upton Park

5 - 1

12 April 1930

DAGENHAM TOWN v. BARRY TOWN : F.A. Cup Replay

Upton Park

0 - 1

4 December 1929

CLEVEDON UNITED v. IMPERIAL UNITED : East Ham Memorial Hospital

Upton Park

? - ?

21 April 1930

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

FRIDAY, MAY 30th

We are at Liverpool Street Station on the evening of May 30lh, a jolly party eagerly anticipating our eighth visit to the Continent and our first visit to Stockholm.

Contrary to the views expressed in some of the papers on Football Tours, West Ham United have again received requests for a second and in some cases a third visit, so that our previous games must have given satisfaction and pleasure to those concerned.

An offer from Peru, Chile and the Argentine was declined, and other offers of Tours in Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden were received, and it was eventually decided to visit Rotterdam, Copenhagen, Gothenburg, Stockholm, and Helsingborg.

After all arrangements for the matches in the north had been completed, we received another invitation to re-visit Southern Germany and witness the Passion Play at Oberammergau, but we were compelled to decline this very tempting offer owing to previous engagements.

 

SS Prague

Our party included E. Hufton, R. Dixon, A. Earl, R. Wade, J. Collins, W. St. Pier, C. Cox, G. Parkin, T. Yews, J. Wood, K, Barter, A. Morris, W. Pollard, J. Ruffell, S. Cribb, I. Wilkins, C. Paynter, W. J. Cearns, G. F. Davis, A. C. Davis, and F. R. Pratt.

 

Leaving Liverpool Street at 8.15, we were at Harwich almost as soon as dinner had been served, and it was not long before we were aboard the S.S. Prague and quickly in bed.

The boat arrived at the Hook of Holland sharp on time and we were all on shore just after 6 a.m. The Customs formalities having been, completed, we soon, found our reserved compartments on the train en route for Rotterdam, where we arrived at 7.30 ready for breakfast.

SATURDAY, MAY 31st

The weather was glorious and a walk through the old part of the City was fully worth-while. The old buildings are claimed to belong to the best of the old Dutch towns. Picturesque streets crossed by numerous canals, and a number of old harbours, made fascinating by the busy inland navigation, the St. Laurens Tower, Great Cathedral, and the Port of Delft, represent beautiful architecture of bygone days.

The afternoon was spent quietly and at 6 p.m. we drove to the Stadium for our first game versus Rotterdam.

The kick-off was at 7.30 p.m., a crowd of 20,000 being present. Our team was :- Hufton, Earl, Cox, Collins, St. Pier, Parkin, Yews, Wilkins, Morris, Pollard, Cribb. The Rotterdam Police Band rendered some fine selections, and as soon as our players turned out, the British and Dutch National Anthems were played, spectators and players standing to attention.

A very fast and interesting game was witnessed, both sides displaying good football.

At half-time we led 1-0, Arthur Morris scoring after 30 minutes' play. During the second half Stanley Cribb scored a typical Ruffell goal, West Ham winning by 2-0. The game was appreciated by the officials of the Rotterdam Association, who lost no time in asking us to pay them a further visit next year.

ROTTERDAM (Netherlands)

Hufton

Earl

Cox

Collins

St Pier

Parkin

Yews

Wilkins

Morris

Pollard

Cribb

 

 

 

Away

2 - 0 (Cribb, Morris)

31 May 1930

Touring party in Rotterdam

Touring Party in Rotterdam

SUNDAY, JUNE 1st.

Receiving a very pressing invitation from the officials of the Ajax Club to witness their game versus Wilheim II for ihe Dutch Championship, several of our party paid a visit to Amsterdam and thoroughly enjoyed a very exciting game, which ended in a win for Ajax 7-2. Others of the party spent the afternoon at the Hague and Scheveningen, the famous Dutch seaside resort.

 

 

MONDAY, JUNE 2nd.

All up early, and at 7.40 we left Rotterdam for Hamburg. Travelling through Germany, one is struck by the wonderful network of railways, and I made enquiries from a prominent official, who was pleased to give me the following facts :-

The German railways employ over 800,000 workmen and officials, the total mileage is over 33,000. On the lines are 30,000 locomotives, 68,000 coaches, 720,000 goods vans; there are 11,400 stations, 1,700 waterworks, 24 gasworks, and 118 electric power stations.

The German Post Office also run 1,400 different lines of Mail omnibuses.

The journey to Hamburg afforded another instance of how small the world is, as, during a stop at Hanover, the well-known music-hall artist, Victor Andre, stepped out of the same coach as we were travelling in, and cordial greetings were exchanged and we found that he was also travelling to Hamburg to fulfil an engagement at the famous Alcazar Theatre.

Arriving at Hamburg at 3.40 p.m., we were soon at the Palace Hotel, and to our surprise we were greeted by the manager with "Hello, Mr. Davis," "Hello, Charles Paynter," and others being named. We were momentarily at a loss to know who was giving us the welcome, until he mentioned Cologne, when we recognised Mr. Engels, who organised our German Tour in 1926. After a wash and brush up, an opportunity was taken to make a tour of the city, as we were leaving early on Tuesday. The two chief landmarks of Hamburg are the gigantic Bismarck monument and St. Michael's Church. The River Alster, forming two large basins, flows through the centre of the city and its banks are lined with public gardens and charming villas. The St. Paul's landing stage reminds us of Liverpool. Hamburg claims to be the largest seaport in Europe. It has a population of over one million people, situated on the River Elbe 68 miles from the sea.

The harbour extends for nearly ten miles and several of the world's largest ships were built here. Some of the city's modern buildings are architecturally interesting owing to the new style in which they are built, Chile House being a remarkable structure. A contrast is seen within a few minutes' walk in Korntrager Alley, where the buildings date back to ancient limes. A visit was also made to the Elbe tunnel, and one was immediately struck by the ingenuity displayed in gelling two tunnels fed without enormous approaches being made as in the case of the new Liverpool-Birkenhead and the earlier Rotherhithe and Blackwall Tunnels.

The Germans have six lifts at either end, each being capable of taking heavy vehicles or 150 persons.

Hamburg is undoubtedly a beautiful place, one of its chief claims being that there are no shops in the centre of the city. The evening was spent at the Hanza and Alcazar Theatres, the performance at the latter place concluding at 2 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, JUNE 3rd.

Leaving Hamburg at 7.45 a.m., the journey to Warnmunde was through flat country, but the transfer of the train from shore to the Ferry was quite interesting.

Lunch was served on the boat and after the first hour the water commenced to get angry and one or two of our party were slightly affected. The trip across the Baltic takes two hours, and another ferry trip was made between Gedser and Copenhagen, where we arrived at 7 p.m. Mr. Swartz received us on behalf of the clubs, and several Press photographers having obtained their pictures, we drove to the Cosmopolite Hotel, and later visited the famous Tivoli Gardens.

 

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4th.

A lovely morning and stroll along the promenade at Langelinie, the fashionable drive between the Citadel and the sea.

There is a beautiful view over the water to the shores of Sweden and it is the most popular walk in the city. Returning from the Promenade into the town, a visit was made to the Flower Market and other places of interest.

At 2 p.m. our Danish friends called with cars to drive us out to Tuborg to look over the famous brewery, and we took the opportunity of expressing our thanks to Mr. George Hyllested and the Company for their courteous hospitality.

At 7 p.m. cars were at the Hotel to take us to the fight between Carl Larsen, of Denmark, and Robert Tassin, of France, in the open air at the Stadium. There was a crowd of 20,000 present, and as all five contests were international, great enthusiasm was displayed. The principal event was the fifteen-round contest, and Larsen was beaten by the Frenchman in eight rounds after a very clean contest. The best fight of the evening was an eight-round contest between Hans Holdt, Denmark, versus Barboteux, France, the Dane receiving a popular verdict after a very stubborn contest.

River Alster Hamburg

The River Alster, Hamburg

COPENHAGEN (Denmark)

Hufton

Earl

Wade

Collins

St Pier

Parkin

Yews

Wilkins

Barter

Pollard

Cribb

Away

3 - 3 (Wilkins 2, Pollard)

5 June 1930

THURSDAY, JUNE 5th.

Our match was fixed for 1.30. There was a crowd of 12,000 present when our team lined up as follows:- Hufton, Earl, Wade, Collins, St. Pier, Parkin. Yews, Wilkins, Barter, Pollard, Cribb.

The start was sensational, as the Danish team scored immediately and within 90 seconds we had equalised. The game was interesting and the Copenhagen side displayed good form, the result, a draw 3-3, being a good reflex of the play. Our goals were scored by Pollard and Wilkins [2).

After the game we were entertained by the officials of the Association and a very pleasant evening terminated our visit to the Danish capilal.

FRIDAY, JUNE 6th.

An early breakfast and hurried departure to catch the 7 a.m. train to Gothenburg. Arriving at Elsinore the train was ferried across to Sweden, and the short sea trip was very enjoyable.

Looking back to Elsinore Castle, memories of Shakespeare are recalled, for it is claimed that Hamlet lies buried in the grounds of this ancient building.

No trouble was experienced from the Customs at Helsingborg and we were soon settled in the train for Gothenburg, where we arrived at 1.35 p.m.

Our match with the Gothenburg Alliance was arranged for 7.30 p.m., and a crowd of 15,000 was present. The Hammers were represented by Dixon, Earl, Cox, Collins, St. Pier, Parkin, Wood, Yews, Morris, Pollard, Cribb. A very good game was seen in the first half, but during the second portion of the game the effects of the previous day's match were shown by our side playing tired, and they were beaten 2-1, our goal being scored by Morris. After the game we had a very pleasant evening with the Gothenburg officials at the Tivoli Gardens.

GOTHENBURG ALLIANCE (Sweden)

Dixon

Earl

Cox

Collins

St Pier

Parkin

Wood

Yews

Morris

Pollard

Cribb

 

Away

1 - 2 (Morris)

6 June 1930

SATURDAY, JUNE 7th.

We were invited to visit Trollhattan and, leaving the Hotel at 9.30, the roads were found to be very bad and our stay at the falls was very limited as we had to be back in Gothenburg to get the 2.15 train to Stockholm.

The drive was thoroughly enjoyed, as was the scenery at the waterfalls, which have been harnessed for the service of mankind. The scenery en route is at times very beautiful, passing through country very rich in small lakes, and two of the largest in Europe, Lakes Vathern and Vanern - the former covers an area of 730 square miles, whilst Vanern has an area of 2,150 square miles - are in this country. The electric power station at Trollhaltan is the largest in Sweden, the engine-room being 446 feet by 66 feet, and contains 13 turbines, with a total horse-power of 166,000. The electric energy is transformed up to 50,000 volts and distributed over the larger part of the provinces of Vastergotland, Bohuslan, and Dalsland. The numerous lakes, waterfalls and rapids make Sweden, from the point of view of water-power, one of the most important countries in the world. The water-power is estimated to be 6,200,000 turbine horse-power, corresponding to 1,050 horse-power per 1,000 inhabitants.

Leaving Gothenburg at 2.15 p.m., for Stockholm, we had before us a seven hours' journey on what is probably the longest electric railway in the, world, the distance between the two cities being 285 miles.

The coaches wore very comfortable and the restaurant service quite up to the standard of home railways.

Great forests were seen en route and it was interesting in know that nearly 60 per cent, of the country is covered with forests. For each 100 inhabitants Sweden has 966 acres of forest; Great Britain has only 7.4 acres per 100 inhabitants. Arriving at Stockholm at 9.15, we were soon at the Carlton Hotel.

 

 

SUNDAY, JUNE 8th.

Stockholm, the capital of Sweden, has a population of 500,000. The spirit of the Modern City is revealed in the daily life along the sparkling fronts, in the charming garden suburbs, magnificent new buildings, and up-to-date amusements. And progress is also reflected by the unending stream nf luxurious motor-cars plying the -streets.

Wide open spaces set aside for parks and city squares make Stockholm a smiling garden city. In the sunlight of summer the flowers are wonderfully brilliant and vivid in colouring, and the verdure is semi-tropical. An atmosphere of the South pervades life on the terraces of the restaurants and hotels. Leisurely enjoyment is also conveyed by the steamers that ply along the gleaming waterways and take you in a few hours over Lake Malaren west to Gripsholm Castle, and to Skokloster and Uppsala. an historic cathedral town, and the same silvery waterways also afford varied opportunities for active sports.

Islands innumerable linked by bridges round which the waters rush, the great Caroline Royal Palace rising above a medley of houses, and the simple fisherman with his net in the swift stream, majestic heights beneath which the city looks like a toy town set in a frame of water, green clad hills, broad plains, and the open sea —this is Stockholm.                        

After lunch some of our party witnessed the display by 10,000 gymnasts, and others paid a visit to the races, where we met our old friend Walter Bullock, who was riding at the meeting, with the result that we found four winners in five races.

The evening was spent at the Theatre; a fairly good revue called " China " was staged, the show did not start until 9 p.m. so as to avoid clashing with the Churches.

Although we could not understand the majority of the items, several numbers were given in English, and the chorus and sets were quite good.

 

 

MONDAY, JUNE 9th.

Wet and cold in the morning, but later the weather brightened and some of the party visited the Stadium to see the game for the local second division championship, while others were on sight-seeing expeditions. And finished the day at the Arc Theatre, where another revue was staged.

The show was quite a good one when a troupe of English girls appeared dressed in the smallest costumes that we have ever seen British dancers appear in during the whole of out travels on the Continent, and we can only assume that competition in the variety business has caused the English girls to accept the same conditions as their Continental sisters.

TUESDAY JUNE 10th.

The sun shining, we quickly made arrangements for a trip to Salsgabaden. Leaving the landing stage at 11a.m, we were soon passing beautiful scenery on both banks of the lake, whilst the speed boats and seaplanes were interesting to watch. Lunch was taken at Salsgabaden Hotel and the return journey on the water finished at 4 p.m. At 6 p.m. we left for the Stadium for the fourth game of the tour. The team selected was Dixon, Cox, Wade, Collins, St. Pier, Parkin, Yews, Pollard, Barter, Wilkins, Cribb.

There were 25,000 spectators, including the Crown Prince and three sons, the Countess of Milford Haven, the Prime Minister, and a large gathering of notable people. The Stockholm team, inspired by the great assembly, gave a splendid exhibition of football and well beat the Hammers 4-0.

As we were returning to Gothenburg by the night train, we were unable to accept the invitation to dine with our Swedish friends, but both teams and officials met together in the club room, where toasts and good wishes were given with champagne accompaniment.

At 10.40 we boarded the night express for Gothenburg, where we arrived at 7 a.m.

STOCKHOLM (Sweden)

Dixon

Cox

Wade

Collins

St Pier

Parkin

Yews

Pollard

Barter

Wilkins

Cribb

Away

0 - 4

10 June 1930

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 11th.

Gothenburg, a city of 240,000 inhabitants, seen from the sea is a very pleasant sight. Everything is so fresh and clean.

Thanks to its excellent situation at the point where the River Gota joins the Cattegat the town rapidly developed and became the commercial centre of Sweden. Gothenburg was built on the Dutch pattern, with regular streets and broad canals, and the inner part of the town, that is still the centre, has preserved the old plan, but most of the canals have been filled. Gothenburg is not only a commercial town, it has manifested interest in art and education. The best way of seeing the harbour, with all its life, is to make a trip on one iif the pleasure steamers plying to and from the various summer resorts.

The right hand side is chiefly taken up with big shipbuilding yards, and on the left side are the large quay for the American liners, the Fish Quay, and tile Carnegie Breweries, and further on an old Fortress stands on an island in mid-stream.

Our second game at Gothenburg was an evening one, and we were represented by Hufton, Earl, Wade. Collins, St. Pier, Cox, Yews, Wilkins, Morris, Pollard and Ruffell. A good game resulted in a win for Gothenburg by 2-1, but we had enough chances to have run out easy winners. The players and officials were the guests of the Gothenburg Alliance at dinner after the game, and a very pleasant gathering terminated by singing Auld Lang Syne, after Mr. Linberg had presented a suitably inscribed cabinet to the West Ham Club and musical numbers rendered by several members of the party.

Stockholm Sweden

Stockholm

GOTHENBURG ALLIANCE (Sweden)

Hufton

Earl

Wade

Collins

St Pier

Cox

Yews

Wilkins

Morris

Pollard

Ruffell

Away

1 - 2 ( ? )

11 June 1930

THURSDAY, JUNE 12th.

We left Gothenburg at 3.20 p.m., a number of the club officials being at the station to see us off, and Helsingborg was reached at 8.20 p.m., where we were received by officials of the local club and found the following official welcome, printed in English, in the newspapers:-

 

WELCOME, WEST HAM.

Members of the West Ham United Football Club.

We extend to you a most hearty welcome to our country and our town and express our sincere hope that you will thoroughly enjoy your stay in Helsingborg.

Needless to say, we have been looking forward with the liveliest interest to your visit and we feel sure that, representing as you do first class English talent, you will justify our most sanguine expectations.

We venture to hope that the forthcoming match will prove a closely-contested spectacle, since our own team may be said to be representative of first class Swedish and, in fact, Scandinavian football in general.

English sportsmanship is proverbial. Fair play has always been the hall mark of the British sportsman and, as we believe our men too to possess the real sporting spirit, the meeting should provide a good fight between two such well-chosen representatives for England and Sweden.

FRIDAY, JUNE 13th.

Helsingborg lies an ideal situation. It lies on and in front of a range of hills which stretch along parallel to the shore of the Oresund. Its elevated section looks out over the harbour to the shore of Denmark. From the terraces can be seen the green spires of Kronburg Castle at Elsinore. One of the oldest cities in the south of Sweden, Helsingborg was a thriving town during the eleventh century.

The section of the town surrounding the market is irregularly laid out with narrow, crooked streets. Old-fashioned, half-timbered houses, with tile roofs, have been wonderfully preserved. At the present time Helsingborg is one of Sweden's wealthiest commercial towns, its large harbour being busy with shipping, and its industrial enterprises having developed rapidly. Steam ferry connections with Elsinore, Denmark, make the town one of the principal ports of entry,

Near Helsingborg are Sofiero, the home of the Crown Prince, renowned for its beautiful gardens, and another famous castle, Kulla Gunnarstorp, and quite adjacent is the famous Swedish health resort, Ramlosa, celebrated for its saline springs.

HELSINGBORG (Sweden)

Hufton

Earl

Wade

Parkin

Cox

St Pier

Yews

Pollard

Morris

Cribb

Ruffell

 

Away

2 - 2 (Cox, Morris)

13 June 1930

After lunch the officials of the Helsingborg Club arranged a trip to Malmer, a very pretty seaside resort, where tea was served, and a very pleasant time passed quickly as we had to be back early to play our last game of the tour versus Helsingborg, who claim to be the best team In Scandinavia.

West Ham were represented by Hufton, Earl, Wade, Parkin, Cox, St. Pier, Yews, Pollard, Morris. Cribb, Ruffell. The game was a good one, both sides displaying fast and clever football, and though we had a lot of openings missed the match ended in a draw 2-2, Cox and Morris scoring for the Hammers.

SS Orange Nassau

SUNDAY, JUNE 15th.

All up early, breakfast being served at 8.30 a.m. Flushing was reached at 12.30, and the S.S. Orange Nassau left for Harwich, where we arrived after a splendid crossing at 7.10 p.m. Dinner was taken en route to London,

All the party arrived home in the best of health, Auld Lang Syne being sung just as the train entered Liverpool Street Station,

I desire to thank Mr. and Mrs. J, Oudheusen, of Amsterdam, Mr, and Mrs. E. Swartz, Mr. Costella, Mr. Gandil and Mr. G. Hyllested, of Copenhagen, Mr. L. Linburg, Mr, S. Nordquist, of Gothenburg. Mr, U. Salchow, of Stockholm, and the officials of the Helsingborg Club, for their hospitality and attention, which made our trip in the three countries an enjoyable one, even though we were unsuccessful in winning the majority of our games.

There is no doubt that Scandinavian football has improved 100 per cent, since our last visit, and there are a large number of players in the three countries equal to 1st League class.

29_12_04 Dagenham Town v. Barry 30_05_10 Ilford v. Walthamstow Avenue 30_04_12 Ilford v. Bournemouth Gasworks

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Outside Brewery in Stockholm

Officials and Players outside one of the most famous breweries in Stockholm

Image courtesty of Simon Lord

Hufton, Hodgeson, Earl, Norris, Barrett, Cadwell, Yews, Earle, Watson, Ball, Ruffell

Baillie

Wade

Norrington

Norris

Smailes

Moran

Wood

Robson

Barter

Ball

Harris

Season 1929-30 1928-29 Friendlies 1930-31 Friendlies

DARTFORD

Away

2 - 3 (Harris, Leightley)

22 February 1930

WEST HAM BOYS v. EAST HAM BOYS : Corinthian Shield (Second Round)

Upton Park

? - ?

16 December 1929

Baillie, Goodacre, Norrington, Norris, Smailes, Cox, Campbell, Robson, Barter, Pollard, Moran

 

Watson, Goodacre, Norrington, Smailes, Hull, Rourke, Evans, Pollard, Campbell, Robson, Moran

 

Watson, Goodacre, Draper W., Baillie D., Smailes, Norrington, Evans, Bailey, Campbell, Pollard, Rourke

 

Baillie

Goodacre

Norrington

Smailes

St Pier

Latter

Couns

Pollard

Moran

Rees

Harris

 

Baillie, Goodacre, Norrington, Dunn, St Pier, Hull, Evans, Pollard, Leightley, Lister, Harris

 

30_04_21 Clevedon United v. Imperial United