A Pictorial History

FOOTBALL PROGRAMMES

WEST HAM UNITED

Steve Marsh & Stuart Allen

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27_03_05 WHU v. Corinthians 26_11_18 WHU v. Lombardians

1926-27 Friendlies

HELDER (Netherlands)

26_12_28 WHU v. Helder SLUG Programme

West Ham United in Denmark, Sweden and Norway in 1927

Recorded by Mr A.C. DAVIS  (Director)

The world-wide popularity of Association Football is shown by invitations being sent us this year to visit the United States of America, Germany, Spain, Denmark, - Sweden and Norway, and being desirous of becoming acquainted with football in Scandinavia we decided to accept the request from Copenhagen, Gothenburg and Oslo for a visit from West Ham.

Our previous tours had taken us to Spain. Holland, Germany, France, Czecho Slavonia, Austria, Hungary and Switzerland, so that we were visiting places entirely new to most of us by going North.

The party which left Liverpool Street on May the 10th. by the 7.40 p.m. boat train, included: E. Hufton, J. Hebden G. Horler, A. Earl, A, Cadwcll, J. Barrett, W. Moore. J. Collins, J. Eccles, T. Yews, V. Watson, J. Johnson, T. Ruffell, J. Loughlin, G. Robson, W. White, F Pratt, G. Davis, L. Johnson, J. W. Y. Ceams, W. T. Cearns, A C. Davis, C. Paynter and E. S. King.

Arriving at Harwich at 10 p.m., we boarded the S.S. Parkeston, and as the sea was rough most of the party were soon in bed where the majority remained until arrival at Esbjerg, where snow had been falling heavily during the day.

As soon as we were through the Customs and having a couple of hours to spare, all the party went to the Palm Restaurant where a very nice supper was served, and as it was the first meal after 14 hours' tossing about at sea, ample justice was done to the food served in the Cabaret. The artistes meanwhile rendering some English songs.

Back to the train at midnight we were very soon in our sleeping berths and awoke next morning nearing Copenhagen, where we arrived at 8 o'clock, and were met at the station by a number of football Officials.

I remarked in the report last year of our visit to Spain, how small the world is and this was again demonstrated for as we were entering the Cosmopolitine Hotel, Dr. Hansen, of Green Street, was just leaving for Upton Park.

The difference in the weather was very noticeable. From Esbjerg to Copenhagen snow was lying on the ground and as we were preparing for a stroll around the city after breakfast snow commenced to fall again, so our first tour of inspection was postponed until after lunch. Copenhagen with its 750,000 inhabitants is described as the Paris of the North, but in some respects it is more like Athens. However there is no doubt that the Danish capital is a magnificent city with fine broad - Boulevards, magnificent old architecture with some of the noblest treasures built by King Christian IV, distinguishes Copenhagen, and when you see the old canals around Christiansborg you feel yourself transported to mediaeval times. The harbour of Copenhagen with its numerous quays and wharves is proof of the vast business carried on in a city where you are always only a few minutes from the sea. The city has many magnificent museums of world wide fame. Thorvaldsen's Museum, Rosenburg Castle, the National Museum, the Glyptother and pleasure spaces include numerous parks. The Tivoli Gardens, Zoological Gardens, and the Frederiksburg Garden are to be recommended and the various Theatres are quite up to the continental standard.

Friday 13th May

The weather has changed, for the sun is shining and we are looking forward to a fine day for the first game of the tour. The kick off was fixed for 1.30 p.m., to leave us free to attend the races which started at 4 p.rn. The whole of our party were given access to the members' enclosure, and thanks to the interest of the English jockeys we nearly all returned on the winning side. The Copenhagen Stadium is one of the finest enclosures on the continent. The turf was in splendid condition and the dressing accommodation compares with any ground in England.

The game was against a combined Copenhagen eleven, and our team was : - Hufton, Hebden, Horler, Collins, Barrett, Cadweil, Yews, Moore, Watson, Johnson, Ruffell. The play on both sides was clean and pleasant. The 20,000 spectators being treated to some goal scoring during the second half, as after crossing over with a clean sheet the Hammers ran out winners by 5- 1. The goals being scored by Johnson, Watson (2), Yews (2). The referee, Mr. Wilhelm Jorgensen, was one of the best we had ever had on the continent.

After the races we were entertained at the Tivolt Gardens, a place almost impossible to aptly describe, there being wonderful dance and concert halls, theatre in open air, numerous restaurants and amusements, and the lighting effects surpassing anything ever seen in England.

Saturday 14th May

COMBINED COPENHAGEN XI (Denmark)

Sunday 15th May 

An early morning walk was made to the sea front, and as the kick-off for the second match was fixed for 1.30 lunch was taken at 11 a.m.

The Copenhagen officials selected an entirely new eleven none of the players in Friday's game taking part. The Hammers' team was: Hufton, Hebden, Earl, Yews, Collins, Cadwell, Eccles, Robson, Watson, Johnson and Ruffell.

The game was again very clean on both sides, and goals were scored by Eccles and Ruffell (2), West Ham winning 3-1.

We were honoured by the presence of King Christian at the match, and at half-time his Majesty came on the field and spoke to each of the players and officials. The remark the King made to Jack Hebden was: "You're a hefty fellow; I should not like to meet you on the left wing,"

After the game we were taken to the seaside and tea was served in the Danish Yacht Club's headquarters, a very delightful spot called Langelince, where Copenhagen people promenade in thousands. On the way back to the hotel we were shown the Royal Palace and other interesting places.

During the evening another visit was made to the enchanting Tivoli Gardens to finish a delightful day, and it is astonishing to English visitors how the Continental people carry on with their late nights, as it appeared to us that more people were coming into the Tivoli at 11.30 p.m. than at any earlier hour.

Directors in the snow

Snow was falling heavily at 7 a.m., but after breakfast the weather suddenly changed and the sun shining brilliantly some of us made a tour of the city. The morning trip being through the Amalianborg Square, which has a fine equestrian statue of King Frederick V in the centre. Following the direction in which the statue is facing the wonderful Marble Church is seen at the end of Frederiksgade. This church was 125 years building. The City's most imposing square is the Kongen's Nytor and it is here we see the Royal Theatre and Opera House, Royal Academy, The Handelsbank Hotel, Angleterre, and Magasin du Nords, the Selfridges of Scandinavia. In the centre is the equestrian statute of King Christian V, which is a favourite meeting place in the city and is known as the Horse. It is from this spot to the Kiosk in the Raadhaspladen that constitutes Copenhagen's favourite promenade. Passing on we arrive at the district called Slotsholmen connected with the ancient history of Denmark, but to-day occupied by the Christiansborg Palace, the Foreign Office and the Courts of Justice.

After lunch our party had been invited to inspect the modern Lager beer Brewery of Tuborg, who are known throughout the world, and the time spent in the various departments was an experience well worth recording, as we have followed the footsteps of such famous people as the King of Denmark, our own late lamented Queen Alexandra, and the Empress Dagcar of Russia. Numerous other world famed people have signed the visitors book of this most up-to-date brewery, where a million bottles of lager beer can he made daily.

Returning to the hotel for dinner, we found an invitation waiting for all the party to visit the famous Schumann Circus, and we were treated to one of the finest shows possible to be seen anywhere. The act of Schumann himself, controlling eighteen horses and six ponies in the ring together, is something to be remembered; and the juggling act of Rasselli was a wonderful piece of work.

Managerial party warmly dressed in the snow

Copenhagen Stadium

3 - 1 (Ruffell 2, Eccles)

15 May 1927

Hufton

Hebden

Horler

Collins

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Moore

Watson

Johnson

Ruffell

COMBINED COPENHAGEN XI (Denmark)

Hufton

Hebden

Earl

Yews

Colins

Cadwell

Eccles

Robson

Watson

Johnson

Ruffell

Copenhagen Stadium

5 - 1 (Watson 2, Yews 2, Johnson)

13 May 1927

Monday 16th May

A trip by motor from Copenhagen had been arranged by our Danish friends for to-day, and shortly after lunch they arrived with a number of private cars, and we were soon on the road to Fredericksborg Castle through pretty stretches of woodland and lakes.

Arriving at Hillerod, one is impressed with beautiful natural scenery, but the notable object is the Castle, which is one of the greatest and most important of the older Nordic buildings, and is one of the most distinguished monuments in the country. Built in the 16th century, it has in the courtyard a wonderful Neptune fountain, which was even more beautiful when first built in 1613, as the magnificent statues, of which the present ones are copies, were carried off as war trophies by the Swedes in 1659. The Castle Church has been the Coronation Church of the Danish Kings since that of Christian IV. In the clock tower is a peal of 27 bells, six different hymns being played - one after the striking of every hour, Returning via the coast road, a stop was made at Scodsborg, a seaside resort about 12 miles from Copenhagen, where tea was provided and, as rain commenced to fall, an impromptu concert was arranged and songs were rendered by George Horler, Joe Johnson, G. F. Davis, L. Johnson and J. W. Cearns, with Tommy Yews at the piano. Arriving back at the hotel about 7.I5, a quick dinner was served, and we later visited the Scala Theatre, where a revue, quite up to the quality of London shows, was staged.

Tuesday 17th May

The sun was shining brightly as we walked out to Langelinie before lunch, the fresh air, and the boulevards being a fine tonic. Cycling plays a prominent part in the life of the Danish people, and we were informed that, of the 750,000 people in Copenhagen, nearly half of them ride cycles, A visit was also paid to the Zoological Gardens and the Botanical Gardens before proceeding to the Stadium.

The kick-off for our last and most important match in Copenhagen was arranged for 7 p.m., and as we were to meet the strongest Danish side, we decided to play Hufton, Hebden, Earl, Collins, Barrett, Cadwell, Yews, Robson, Watson, Moore, Ruffell.

The Copenhagen team was practically their internationial side, and the game was the best of the three matches. The good play on both sides was enjoyed by the 15,000 spectators present. West Ham won by 2-0, Robson and Watson being the scorers.

After the game both teams and officials were entertained at a banquet, served in the spacious restaurant attached to the Stadium, and after dining, during which the health of the Kings of England and Denmark were drank with musical honours, the party adjourned to another hall, where a smoking concert was held, several of our party rendering excellent items.

Mr. Henry Larsen spoke of the great pleasure the visit of West Ham had been to all the Danish officials and players, and emphasised the fact that the Hammers had given the cleanest exhibition of football ever seen in Denmark, and hoped that they would see them in Copenhagen again very soon.

In the three games Copenhagen played 30 different players, and the general opinion of them all was that West Ham played clever and clean football. The concert finished about 4 a.m., and as we were due to leave for Gothenburg just after noon all were soon in bed.

Copenhagen Stadium

2 - 0 (Robson, Watson)

17 May 1927

COPENHAGEN (Denmark)

Hufton

Hebden

Earl

Collins

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Robson

Watson

Moore

Ruffell

 

Wednesday 18th May 

We left Copenhagen at 2.12 p.m. for Gothenburg, a large number of our Danish friends being at the station to wish us "Au revoir." Arriving at Helsingor at 4.15 p.m., the train was ferried across to Sweden, and from the boat could be seen Kronberg Castle, where in the park is the supposed Hamlet's grave and Ophelia's Well, as recorded in Shakespeare's play; and a little further along the coast is the town of Odense, the birthplace of that famous writer of fairy tales, Hans Anderson.

Arriving at Heisingborg we were required to fill in cards of identification and pass the Customs, but there was no trouble, for as soon as they knew we were West Ham Football Club we were told to close our bags. Leaving at 4.45 p.m. we had a five hours journey to Gothenburg, during which time we witnessed a glorious sunset at 8.30 p.m.

The country appeared to be extensively cultivated, hardly any grazing land being noticed over the 200 miles between Helsingborg and Gothenburg. Arriving at the latter town about 10 p.m. we were welcomed by the officials of the several clubs in the town who, after seeing us fixed up at the Palace Hotel, drove us to a famous restaurant, where we were entertained to supper.

Thursday 19th May

A beautiful morning, and a walk before breakfast. Our Swedish friends arrived about 11 o'clock to take the party for a drive round the town. Gothenburg is the principal seaport of Sweden, having a population of 200,000 people, and it is very fine and clean, has splendid boulevards, a wonderful natural park, and the canals give a pleasant contrast to the home towns. The principle objects of interest are the Hamnen, Norra-on-Sodra, Stottsskogen, Botanical Garden, and the Skansen Leyonet. It is also from this city that the famous Gota Canal, one of the oldest in the world, connects by water the City of Stockholm, 347 miles distant. The great power station at Trollhattan, with its renowned waterfall, is an object of great interest, as nearly 200,000 horse-power of electrical energy are being generated by the waterfall (the white coal of Sweden).

Friday 20th May

The sun, shining brightly, brought all down early for breakfast. We received invitations to visit the works of the S.K.F. Ball-Bearing Company and Messrs. Kanolds Chocolate Factory. Mr. N. Gibson, of the Swedish English Society, arrived about 11 a.m. to accompany the party. The confectionery works were first visited, and the various processes the different sweetmeats went through were explained by Mr. Raymond Kanold, and our boys were not slow in tasting all the good things shown. After thanking the management for their courtesy we motored to the S.K.F. Works at the other side of the town to see the process of manufacture of ball and roller bearings. The S.K.F. is the largest works of its kind in the world, employing over 2,400 people, which, together with the branch factories in England and America, have a total staff of 10,500.

Our party were conducted over the works by Mr, S. Wikstrom, who had been for some considerable time at the S.K.F. Works at Luton, and he was able to explain to us all the details in perfect English. We witnessed the bursting test of three 1 inch balls, placed one on the other, and a pressure of 38 tons applied before they collapsed. The balls are so perfectly made that one dropped on a surface plate will bounce between sixty and seventy times before stopping in practically the centre of the plate. The Gothenburg works can turn out 14,000 ball bearings per day of 1,100 different types, with balls from one-eighth to eight inches in diameter. The Swedish factory consumes about 20,000 tons of steel per annum, at a cost of 800,000 kroner. The inspection of these works was an education to all our party, who were impressed with the wonderful organisation involved in the manufacture of what is, to the average cyclist, a very minor part of his machine.

GOTHENBURG (Sweden)

Gothenburg Stadium

4 - 3 (Barrett, Ruffell, Yews)

20 May 1927

Hufton

Hebden

Earl

Collins

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Moore

Loughlin

Johnson

Ruffell

For the fourth game of our tour the team selected was; Hufton, Hebden, Earl, Collins, Barrett, Cadwell, Yews, Moore, Loughlin, Johnson and Ruffell.

The Gothenburg Stadium is a splendid and well-appointed ground, and the natural beauty of the surrounding hills make a picture seldom seen on a football enclosure. Taxes are very high, 20 per cent, of the gate money being taken by the City as rent and 30 per cent, entertainment tax. The match here was against a picked team and, as Gothenburg are reputed to be the best Continental side, they last year beat Aston Villa 5-1 and 3-2, and Derby County 3-1, our players knew they were up against a tough proposition. The weather was ideal for football, and a crowd of 20,000 assembled to witness a very keen struggle, as the Swedish players maintained their reputation and played a splendid game, the scoring being 1-1, 2-2, 3-3, and Barrett scored the fourth goal for the Hammers a few minutes before the finish of a keen game, in which we saw several Swedes who would be an acquisition to any league club.

After the game both teams and officials were entertained at the Palace Hotel, where an excellent dinner was served. Mr. Paiman, a former resident of Woodford, was in the chair, and in the course of his speech said that, after several years, their endeavours to get West Ham to visit Gothenburg had been realised, and what they had seen he hoped that, if possible, we would repeat our visit next year, as they heartily agreed with the reports they had read in the Danish papers that the Hammers played the cleanest football ever they had seen.

The Chairman asked Mr. W. F. White (chairman of the West Ham Club) to accept a piece of silver, upon which was mounted the badges of the clubs, as a memento of the visit; and Mr. E. S. King (secretary) was presented with a silver cigarette case. Musical items were rendered by Mr. Ludoc Genizel, Mr. Heian, Mr. Boorklund, Mr. Joe Johnson, Mr. George Horler, Mr. G. F. Davis and Mr. Thomas Yews, and a very pleasant assembly disbanded early on.

Thursday 26th May

A bright morning and a moderate sea. The 8 a.m. breakfast bell did not bring many of our party out, but most were up by 10 a.m., and as the wind had dropped we were having a pleasant trip, and it was anticipated we should reach Harwich by 4.30, but still better time was made, and we landed at 4 p.m.

A quick run to Liverpool Street, during which dinner was served, and at 7 p.m. our party dispersed, after completing one of the best trips made, thanks to the excellent arrangements of the International Sleeping Car Company. The tour had been a success from a football aspect, as well as a pleasant holiday, the five matches being won as follows:- Copenhagen 5-1, 3-1, 2-0; Gothenburg: 4-3; Oslo: 6-2; total goals 20-7. The goals were scored by V. Watson 4, J. Ruffell 6, T. Yews 3, J. Johnson 3, W, Moore 1, G. Robson 1, J. Barrett 1, J. Eccles 1.

HM the King

H.M. the King of Denmark meets the players at half-time

Gotenborg Stadium 1927 Tour Match

FOLKESTONE

LOMBARDIANS

Away

1 - 2 (Whitehead)

18 September 1926

Away

3 - 1 (Kay, Ruffell W., Whitehead)

23 September 1926

CLACTON

Away

4 - 1 (Dowsey, Eccles, Ruffell W., Turner)

29 September 1926

26_12_11 WHU v. London University 01

METROPOLITAN POLICE : Reserves

Upton Park

6 - 2 (Goalscorers unknown)

14 October 1926

LOMBARDIANS

Upton Park

3 - 4 (Goalscorers unknown)

18 November 1926

LONDON UNIVERSITY

Upton Park

5 - 2 (Goalscorers unknown)

11 December 1926

Upton Park

7 - 5 (Dowsey 2, Williams 2, Bishop, Moore, Payne)

28 December 1926

WOLVERHAMPTON WANDERERS

Molineux

2 - 2 (Ruffell 2)

8 January 1927

ROYAL AIR FORCE : Reserves

Upton Park

9 - 1 (Gibbins 4, Lock 3, Dowsey 2)

12 February 1927

Saturday 21st May

We were leaving Gothenburg by the 1.40 p.m. train for Oslo and, as Blackburn Rovers were due to arrive on the same train, we arranged to give them an English greeting, but were disappointed, as they had presumably altered their schedule, and we left with the wishes of our Swedish friends for an early return. The scenery during the eight hours journey to Oslo was a succession of beautiful pictures of woodland, lakes and waterfalls, the one at Sarpsfoerg being like a miniature Niagara rapids.

The train was on time at Oslo, where we were met by a number of officials, including the chairman of the Alliance, Mr. Granum. Cars were waiting to drive us to the Grand Hotel, and we were later taken for a stroll through the principal thoroughfares.

Sunday 22nd May

The last game of the tour was arranged to kick off at one p.m. and, as H.M. the King of Norway and Crown Prince Olaf had decided to honour the match with their presence, we decided to field:- Hufton, Hebden, Earl, Collins, Barrett, Cadwell, Yews, Moore, Watson, Johnson, Ruffell. The game proved to be quite an easy thing for the Hammers, who won 6-2, goals being scored by Watson Ruffell (2), Johnson (2) and Moore.

The King, Prince Olaf, and the gentlemen in attendance appeared to be quite pleased with the football played by the West Ham players. I append the welcome the Oslo clubs printed on the front page of the programme in English:

Welcome...

"We take great pleasure in extending to the Representatives and the Players of The West Ham Football Club a cordial welcome to Norway. Being the first time that your club visits Norway, we sincerely hope that you all will take nothing but pleasant memories with you when you go away from here and we further hope that you will return at some future date for the enjoyment of both the general public and the football players here. Despite the fact that spring has been unusually tardy this year and nature thus does not show herself as smiling as the season should warrant, we nevertheless hope that our guests will feel at home among us and derive as much pleasure and benefit out of their visit as possible. The undersigned Clubs will at any rate do their utmost in order that the visit may become an enjoyable and cordial as possible. We here in Norway have always looked upon British Football—which we consider the best in the World - with admiration and awe, and we follow closely the games played in your home country. We are thus not unfamiliar with the results attained by your club, and take the opportunity to offer our best congratulations with your fine season. We are fully aware of the fact that the place you occupy in the Great English League is an accomplishment of the first order. We also know that your players on several occasions participate in representative combination teams, and we anticipate with joy to see these players in action. The Football Sport here in Oslo is not at present exactly in a flourishing situation and we need badly the opportunity to watch a team able to show us the sport at its best. And as we now have a good turf playing ground we hope that your players will be able to 'cut loose' like they were at home.

 

       We wish welcome to Oslo,

                           Lyn-Frigg-allamcen.

The evening was spent at the circus, where we witnessed the performance of an Indian Fakir who jumped on broken glass, stood on the edges of sharp swords and put lighted torches in his mouth, and did other uncanny tricks. Oslo, the capital city of Norway, has a population of  300,000, and is situated on a beautiful bay dotted with numerous islands, whilst the surrounding scenery is magnificent.

Monday 23rd May

An excursion to Frogneisoherln was arranged and a panorama of beautiful scenery is unfolded all along the route. The view from Lillwand is gorgeous, and it is impossible for anyone to adequately describe the grandeur of the picture. The sea, mountains, trees, flowers, lakes, ice and snow, with the sun shining brilliantly, was a combination making a scene long to be remembered. Snowballing was indulged in before taking refreshment at the restaurant on top of the mountain, where a pleasant time was spent previous to returning to Oslo for lunch and packing our bags for home.

Our return journey commenced at six p.m., when the train pulled out of Oslo station en route for Copenhagen and England. We arrived at Frederikshald at 9 p.m and luncheon baskets were put on the train, sleeping berths fixed up, and after a light meal, most of the party were soon in bed, sleeping through the all-night journey to Copenhagen, where we arrived at 8.30 a.m.

Tuesday 24th May

We broke the journey home for 24 hours, during which time shopping expeditions were made. An invitation had been extended to us to witness the second game between Copenhagen and Middlesbrough, who were defeated by the local team on Sunday, the 22nd, 4 goals to 2.

Arriving at the Stadium at 6.15 p.m., we met the Middlesbrough officials and players, and the various games were discussed before the kick off at 7 p.m. Middlesbrough were out to retrieve their first lapse. They were the better aide all round and eventually ran out winners by 8 goals to 2. During dinner one evening Jack Hebden, on behalf of the players, presented Charlie Paynter with a silver cigarette case; and a cigar case was presented by the directors to Ebbe Swartz, for his untiring energy on behalf of the whole party, which made our stay at Copenhagen one of the best holidays we have had on the Continent.

Wednesday 25th May

On the journey to Esbjerg we were given a few flying stunts by a Danish airman, who at one time was flying alongside the train not more than 30ft. from the ground. Arriving at Kossar the whole train was transported by the ferry from Zeeland to Friesfeind, the passage across the water taking nearly two hours. During the trip luncheon was served on the ferry, which are the largest boats of the kind we have seen. Leaving Usberg about 12.30 p.m, we boarded the second train ferry at 1.15, and were landed on Jutland about 2.30, from whence the train ran through to Esbjerg, where we arrived at 4.45. The s.s. Bernstorit left Esbjerg at 5.15, and as a rather strong wind was blowing it was feared that we were in for a bad crossing. Dinner was served at 5.30, and as most of the party had taken a good tea on the train, a number of us had no room for dinner, served so early, and soon retired for the night.

OSLO (Norway)

Oslo

6 - 2 (Johnson 2, Ruffell 2, Moore, Watson)

22 May 1927

Hufton

Hebden

Earl

Collins

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Moore

Watson

Johnson

Ruffell

MILLWALL : London Professional Charity Cup

Upton Park

1 - 1 (Barrett)

22 November 1926

CORINTHIANS

Upton Park

3 - 4 (Gibbins 2, Moore)

5 March 1927

SWINDON TOWN : RESERVES

26_12_04 WHU v. Swindon Reserves

Upton Park

1 - 0 (Goalscorer unknown)

4 December 1926

27_02_12 WHU v. RAF

SIR ALFRED FRIPP'S FROTHBLOWERS XI

Upton Park

? - ?

27 April 1927

Sir Alfred Downing Fripp : Surgeon to King Edward VII and King George V (1865-1930)

 

Sir Fripp was a huge benefactor to East End causes for the poor. Born 12th September 1865, in Blanford, Dorset, the son of watercolourist, Alfred Downing Fripp, and Eliza Bannister Roe. His great grandfather was marine artist, Captain Nicholas Pocock, who was commissioned to illustrate the official biography of Nelson, for his understanding of the intricacies of rigging and his nautical knowledge.

The palette knife, however, was not for Sir Alfred, instead his skilled hands were destined to save the lives of Kings and countrymen, with the razor precision of a surgical blade. He was Surgeon in Ordinary to King Edward VII from 1897 to 1910 and also to King George V from 1910, and to H.R.H. Duke of Connaught from 1909.

Among his charitable deeds he was chairman of Ye Ancient Order of Froth Blowers, a fraternity set up for Sir Alfred by Mr. Bert Temple, a wealthy patient and friend, to raise money for children's charities and hospitals. They raised some very large sums of money to help the 'wee waifs' of London's East End.

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

SORRY NO IMAGE

MILLWALL : London Professional Charity Cup

Upton Park

5 - 2 (Watson 2, Bishop, Johnson, Yews [pen])

25 October 1926

Kane

Henderson

Earl

Cowper

Hull

Fletcher

Weale

Dowsey

Gibbins

Lock

Barker

Baillie

Hebden

Horler

Collins

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Earle

Gibbins

Johnson

Moore

SOUTHEND UNITED : Sportsman's Hospital Appeal Fund

The Kursaal

2 - 0 (Goalscorers unknown)

23 March 1927

Season 1926-27 1925-26 Friendlies 1927-28 Friendlies

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

SWINDON TOWN : Reserves

Away

2 - 2 (Campbell, Dowsey)

11 December 1926

Thursday afternoon in April, 1927, West Ham put out a team to play a Froth Blowers XI - and 20,000 spectators, mainly “wee waifs,” turned out to watch the spectacle. Sir Alfred kicked off – and, as he was 62, retired to the stands. Bert Temple (47) played centre-forward and was supported by luminaries from the world of entertainment, such as Harry Tate, Billy Merson and the 30-stone Tubby Phillips – in goal. Jack Hobbs, the most famous – and most popular – cricketer of his age, acted as referee. Spectators were exhorted to attend a county cricket match later that year, which was to be for the benefit of Jack Hobb’s opening partner, Andy Sandham:

Blower Andrew Sandham (Surrey XI) is having a benefit at the Oval, 20th August, 1927, Surrey v. Yorkshire. Andy being one of the earliest members of Ye A. O. F. B., it is particularly requested by No. 0 that all cricketing members of the fraternity will assemble to do their bit for Andy. Private A. Sandham and Lance Corporal Bert Temple shared blankets, bully-beef, baccy and beer together in the 1st Sportsman’s Battalion somewhere in France. Don’t forget Andy’s Oval Financial benefit.

Twelve-year-old Master R. C. Fripp was the “prolific goal-getter,” and over £500 was raised for charity. The final score is not recorded. West Ham sent a representative to Fripp’s Memorial Service in 1930.

Sir Alfred Fripp SLUG Programme

Other Matches Played at the Boleyn Ground

WEST HAM BOYS v. EAST LONDON BOYS : Sun Shield Final

Upton Park

? - ?

30 April 1927

27_04_30 WH Boys v. East London Boys Sun Shield Fi

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Hufton

Hebden

Hodgson

Carter

Barrett

Collins

Yews

Bishop

Watson

Moore

Johnson

MATCH ABANDONED

Reason ? : rearranged for 22 November 1926

West Ham United won on toss of coin

 

Hufton

Hebden

Hodgson

Carter

Barrett

Collins

Yews

Earle

Watson

Moore

Williams

SORRY NO IMAGE

Baillie, Cowper, Horler, Dowsey, Gibbs, Wilkins, Eccles, Locke, Whitehead, Mercer, Storrie

Baillie, Cowper, Earl, Wilkins, Kay, Fletcher, Weale, Dowsey, Whitehead, Ruffell W., Storrie

Baillie, Earl, Horler, Cowper, Kay, Wilkins, Eccles, Dowsey, Turner, Ruffell W., Johnson

UNITED SERVICES

Chatham

? - ?

23 September 1926

Lineup unknown

Kane, Eastman, Earl, Hull, Kay, Cadwell, Payne, Dowsey, Campbell, Williams, Eccles

Baillie

Henderson

Horler

Hull

Cox

Cadwell

Payne

Dowsey

Bishop

Moore

Williams

Kane

Eastman

Wilkins

Cowper

Kay

Fletcher

Weale

DowseyRuffell W.

Johnson

Barker

PRACTICE MATCH:

Reds v. Blues

Upton Park

4 - 1

14 August 1926

REDS:

Earle, Moore, Yews, Watson

 

Hufton

Hebden

Horler

Bishop

Barrett

Cadwell

Yews

Earle

Watson

Moore

Ruffell J.

 

 

BLUES:

Dowsey

 

Kane

Eastman

Banks P.

Carter

Hull A.

Collins

Weale

Dowsey

Surtees

Johnson

Eccles

 

 

 

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PRACTICE MATCH:

Reds v. Blues

Upton Park

6 - 0

21 August 1926

REDS:

Earle 3, Cowper [og], Gibbins, Yews

 

Hufton

Hebden

Earl

Bishop

Barrett

Collins

Yews

Earle

Gibbins

Moore

Ruffell J.

 

 

BLUES:

 

 

Baillie

Cowper

Horler

Carter

Hull A.

Wilkins

Eccles

Dowsey

Campbell

Surtees

Ruffell W.

 

 

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BERKHAMPSTEAD TOWN : Reserves

Away

3 - 2 (Weale 2, Payne)

29 January 1927

Lineup unknown

Lineup unknown

Lineup unknown

Lineup unknown

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REDHILL : Reserves

Away

4 - 4  (Weale 2, Dowsey, Eccles)

26 March 1927

MARGATE : Reserves

Away

2 - 4 (Fletcher 2)

9 April 1927

Kane, Henderson, Wilkins, Ruffell W., Hull, Fletcher, Eccles, Dowsey, Weale, Williams, Payne

Kane, Eastman, Henderson, Cowper, Hull, Wilkins, Payne, Ruffell W., Fletcher, Moore, Williams

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ESSEX v. LONDON : Representative Match

Upton Park

0 - 5

2 May 1927

PROFESSIONALS v. AMATEURS : England Trials

Upton Park

1 - 1 (Campbell)

9 May 1927

Wood, Parker, Orr, Oliver, Barrett, Hilley, Osborne, O'Callaghan, Campbell, Blyth, Black

 

West Ham United players: Jimmy Barrett and John Campbell playing for teh Professionals