A Pictorial History

FOOTBALL PROGRAMMES

WEST HAM UNITED

Steve Marsh & Stuart Allen

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1923-24 Friendlies

SLUG Programme

West Ham United Club Tour in Germany, Switzerland and France 1924

Recorded by Mr A.C. DAVIS  (Director)

Anything that may have been in the minds of our party as to the manner in which the German people would receive us was quickly dissipated, as right from the opening of our tour in Cologne to the Friburg match there was never any sign of feeling or hostility. Everything passed off without a hitch, and the reception of our party was everywhere most cordial. Very little external poverty was to be seen, but the wages paid are extraordinarily low, the average for both skilled men and labourers being 3s. 4d. per day. Tramwaymen’s wages are down to 18 marks per week.

All our party were greatly struck with the cleanliness of the people, especially the children. A remarkable long programme of sight-seeing had been arranged by the officials of the various Clubs, and although the heat on most of the days was very great, the tour was thoroughly enjoyed by all.

 

ABOARD THE LUGGER

Leaving, Liverpool Street Station at 8:30 pm on May 8th, we boarded the s.s. “St. George at Harwich at 10:00 pm, in company with the Aberdeen F.C., who were travelling to North Germany.

Our party included Messrs. J.W.Y. Cearns, W.J. Cearns, A.C. Davis, G.F. Davis, Frank Pratt, E.S. King, A. Searles, T. Hampson, W. Kaine, J. Young, W. Henderson, J. Hebden, G. Kay, J. Collins, S. Bishop, G. Carter, A. Cadwell, W. Edwards, T. Yews, V. Watson, L. Robinson, J. Campbell, W. Moore, W. Williams, J. Ruffell, and C. Paynter.

After a fine sea passage we arrived at the Hook of Holland at 6:00 am. The usual Customs’ search being finished we settled down in our reserved compartments for a five hours’ journey to Cologne.

 

COWS WITH OVERCOATS

Passing through Holland one noticed the care taken with the cattle grazing in the fields, a large proportion being covered with a kind of overcoat. Queries were raised as to why this was done, Robby suggesting that it was to keep the milk hot for coffee, whilst frank Pratt was keen to know who was the tailor.Nothing of note occurred during the remainder of the journey to Cologne, where we arrived at 1:30 pm, being met at the station by officials of the city clubs and Sergt Le Crerer, the football editor of the “Cologne Post,” which is the paper published by the Rhine Army. During the afternoon the shopping centre was visited, but prices were very high, and the rate of exchange was against us.

In the evening our party was invited to the Cavelu Theatre, which is an entirely different concern from anything seen in London, the audience being seated at small tables, where food and drinks are served while the performance is going on. The show was one of the best. There were two English turns on the bill – Walker’s Academy Girls and Miss Elsie Terry.

 

SATURDAY 10th MAY - COLOGNE CATHEDRAL

The morning was spent in visiting the Cathedral, and we were fortunate in securing as our guide the services of a priest who spoke English well. The erection of this wonderful structure was commenced in the year 1248, and it was not completed until 1880 – over 600 years. The towers are 460ft high, and the length of the building is 400ft. the windows are magnificent works of art. Nearly all of them were removed during the war, placed out of reach of damage, and returned to their positions after hostilities had ceased. Every piece of wood in the choir stalls has been carved by hand, and the general effect is wonderful. The lighting of this portion of the Cathedral is, however, quite modern, over 1,5000 electric lamps having been installed.

THURSDAY 15th MAY: LOOKING AFTER THE TAXES

Some of the party were up early and had a motor tour around the city. Again we found the French soldiers posted with barbed wire fencing at each end of the industrial district. No vehicles were allowed to pass without being searched and materials checked for tax. After breakfast we were taken to Heidelburg, the university town of Germany, and were struck with the large number of students in the streets, and the shapes and colours of the college caps, as well as the large number of lads who, judging by the scars on their faces, had evidently engaged in duelling.

Heidelburg is a beautiful place, built in a valley, the hills rising each side from 1,500ft. to 1,800ft. high, with the river Necker flowing into the Rhine. The town has been the centre of European hopes and ambitions, troubles being recorded as far back as the time of Charlemagne. The castle, the beauty of which can be still seen, was destroyed by the French nearly four hundred years ago.

A walk through the town and along the banks of the river brought us to a ferry. Although the water is always running in one direction, by means of a fixed overhead wire and two large rudders it can proceed quickly without any power in either direction. Crossing by the ferry, we were taken to one of the most ancient hotels known for lunch. This place, which is finely fitted out, was built in the year 1592. In the afternoon we made the ascent of the mountain with more wonderful views of the Rhineland. Returning to Mannheim for dinner, we were later invited to the Apollo Music Hall, and saw an exceedingly good show.

 

FRIDAY 16th MAY: THE BIRTHPLACE OF MARTIN LUTHER

The weather was still very fine, and we had another stroll through Mannheim, being taken to see the Palace of Schloss, which is claimed to be the largest in Europe, having a frontage to the building alone of 1,800 feet. One particular feature of this town is the enormous number, and the systematic planting of the trees.

Leaving at 11:00 am, we arrived at Frankfurt-on-Maine at 1 pm. Frankfurt, the birthplace of Martin Luther, Goethe, Schiller, and other famous men, is a beautiful place of 500,000 inhabitants. We were welcomed by the officials of the city clubs, and then conducted to the Royal hotel, the manager of which, Mr. Harry Rinehart, was a former East Ham resident, having lived in High Street South for fifteen years. Immediately after lunch we were taken by motor to Staalburg Castle, which was built by the Romans, and is in a splendid state of preservation. The route chosen was via Homburg, a fine watering-place much admired by the late King Edward. Returning to Frankfurt for dinner, the evening was spent in sight-seeing.

MONDAY 12th MAY

We left Gladbach at 1:40 pm, a large number assembling at the hotel to see us off. Arriving at Cologne again, we boarded the electric train for Godesburg, a small village a few miles from the university town of Bonn. We were booked at one of the best hotels on the Rhine, and the magnificent scenery viewed from the windows overlooking the river was enchanting. After dining, some of the party wanted some German beer, but could not find a suitable beerhouse. It appeared rather funny when the principle waiter at the hotel walked through the village street to show us the way to a “pub” and incidentally to show us how to drink!

 

TUESDAY 13th MAY: “BLACK SOLDIERS IN A BEAUTIFUL CITY”

The weather was glorious. Breakfast over, walks through the town of Bonn were made, and one felt hurt to see black soldiers in such a beautiful city. It is not to be wondered at that the German people feel bitter against the French for their action in stalling the Algerians in a city comparable to Oxford or Cambridge.

Another reason why the German people hate the French in the Rhineland is that the French, in operating the railways, are refusing to accept German money for railway tickets, making travellers get the money changed into francs at a discount office which they operate, charging heavily on each transaction.

Some of our party went to the top of Godesburg Castle ruins (the building was destroyed by the French in the year 1600) and had some fine views of the country. Lunch was taken early, and at 1:30 pm. We boarded a motor launch, and were conveyed to a very nice resort called Konigswinter, which is at the foot of the Drakenfeld Mountain. Going ashore, we were immediately surrounded by men offering carriages, horses and donkeys to take us to the top. These and the mountain railway were patronised by various members of the party.

Arriving at the top we were rewarded by one of the most magnificent sights to be seen almost anywhere. It was gloriously clear, and with field glasses a range of fifty miles could be compassed with the Rhine winding its way north and south. Leaving Konigswinter at 5:30, we followed the banks of the river to Remengen, where we arrived at 8:00 pm. Passing the whole journey of 2½ hours in an express train, admiring the changing panorama of the Rhine on one

side, and the intensive system of vineries formed upon the slopes of the hills for hundreds of miles. Dinner at Remengen was served in the open outside the hotel, and we were informed that, owing to the local industry of wine-making, no beer or mineral waters were to be sold in the town.

THE FIRST MATCH

In the afternoon we repaired to the British race meeting with more or less success at finding winners. Leaving before the last race we drove through Cologne to the football ground on the other side of the river. Among the spectators were the Commander-in-Chief (General Sir Alex Godley), Sir Hugh Clifford, Mr. J. Piggott (British Commissioner), and a large number of officers.

COLOGNE (Germany)

Cologne

2 - 0 (Moore, Ruffell)

10 May 1924

MUNCHENGLADBACH (Germany)

Gladbach

6 - 1 (Campbell 2, Moore 2, Watson, Carter)

11 May 1924

SUNDAY 11th MAY - ANOTHER WIN

Leaving Cologne at 10:00 am we arrived at Gladbach at noon. Lunch was served at the Hotel Lennartz. At 4:00 pm we arrived at the ground to find a sports meeting in full swing. There was some very fine performances by the German champion sprinter Houben.

Godley

The team was received with enthusiasm by the crowd, and called before General Godley, who addressed our boys, welcoming them again to Cologne. Then occurred an act that made all the German people present gasp with astonishment and unbounded delight, for the Commander-in-Chief of the British Rhine Army addressed the Cologne players, and shook hands with the whole team.

Short speeches were made by the officials of both Clubs; then Mr. Stengel, of Cologne, presented to the West Ham Club a silk banner to commemorate our visit.

The match was quite interesting, and resulted in a two-goal victory for the Hammers, Ruffell and Moore scoring. After the game both teams dined together. Some fine musical numbers were rendered by members of the Cologne Opera Co., and a very enjoyable evening was spent. Before the conclusion of the banquet Mr, Stengel made an impressive appeal for a better and closer understanding between Great Britain and Germany, which he hoped the visits of English football teams to Germany would do much to foster Mr. G. Davis responded on behalf of West Ham.

General Sir Alex Godley

Muncen Gladbach is a town of 150,000 inhabitants and its principle industry is textile cotton. Owing to the charge for admission having been increased by 200 per cent, the ‘gate’ was not up to expectations. The kick-off was timed for 6:00 pm, but it was nearly 6:30 o’clock before the preliminary speeches and presentations were through, President Herr Von den Hedgt urging the need for a better understanding between Germany and Great Britain. The West Ham players gave a fine exhibition of football, and ran out 6-1, Campbell (2), Moore (2), Watson and Carter scoring. The refereeing in the game by Herr Dauwoens was first-class. We were entertained at a banquet and dance after the match, and it was early morning before the party broke up.

WEDNESDAY 14th MAY

Another fine day in view as the sun was shining into the windows at 5:00 am. After breakfast in the open air we again embarked on a launch for Bingen en route for Mannheim, where we were to play our third game that evening. Arriving at 1:45 pm. We were met at the station by officials of the Mannheim Clubs and taken to the Park Hotel. Lunch was served, and at 6:00 pm we arrived at the football ground.

The Mannheim team played a good game, but were eventually beaten before ten thousand spectators by 4-0, the goal-scorers being Watson, Williams, Robinson and Yews. Returning to the hotel, a fine dinner was served, after which most of the party had a stroll through the city.

An instance of the rather brutal manner in which the French are enforcing their views upon the Germans was witnessed by our party. We were in a tramcar crossing the Rhine, when French soldiers boarded it, and made ladies turn out their handbags and market baskets – for what purpose none of us could see.

MANNHEIM (Germany)

Mannheim

4 - 0 (Robinson, Watson, Williams, Yews)

14 May 1924

FRANKFURT (Germany)

Frankfurt

4 - 0 (Robinson 4)

17 May 1924

SATURDAY 17th MAY

Another beautiful morning, but most of the party late risers. At 10:30 am the officials of the Frankfurt Club arrived at the hotel to take us for a round of sight-seeing. Motors were provided, and we were driven round the city. There are splendid avenues of trees everywhere. A stop was made at the Palm Gardens, which are claimed to be the most gorgeous in Europe, and the wonderful blooms seen were envied by all lovers of flowers. The buildings of this city are very fine, special note being taken of the railway station, which has 26 lines. A business call was made at the British consulate by the writer, and every assistance required was readily given by the Consul (Mr. A. J. Percival Butler) and the staff.

A visit was paid to the old town, which dates back 1,250 years, and numerous ancient buildings are to be seen, including the Town Hall, where twelve German Emperors were crowned between 1262 and 1692. A pleasing incident occurred before the commencement of the game with Frankfurt. A little girl, walking on to the field, accompanied by a page, presented each of our players with a spray of carnations. The game started at 6:30 pm, before a large crowd, but the German players could not tumble to the off-side rule, and were eventually beaten 4-0, all the goals being scored by Robinson. It was 10 pm before the banquet started both teams dining at the Weinhaus Riedling. As our party entered the hall the orchestra struck up “God bless the Prince of Wales,” and after the first course Mr. Hermann Schoendube proposed the toast of “The King,” which was received with musical honours. The second course disposed of, Mr. L. Johnson gave the toast of “the German Nation,” which was responded to with enthusiasm. Later Mr. White accepted on behalf of West Ham, a bronze tablet suitably framed, as a memento of our visit to the city.

SUNDAY 18th MAY: A LICKING

We had to be up a 6:00 am, being booked to leave Frankfurt at 7:00 am for Friburg. A six hours’ train journey in tropical heat, the late night at the Frankfurt banquet, and turning out to play with a burning sun and a referee who was not up to the class of those controlling the previous games, resulted in the first defeat of the Hammers during their tour on the Continent.

Friburg, who are a good thrustful side, won by 5-2, two of the goals being glaring cases of the off-side infringement. The Hammers had the ball in the net in the first few minutes, but the goal was disallowed. The football ground in this town is set in one of the number of beautiful pictures we were privileged to see in South Germany, and it is impossible to aptly describe the view from any part of it.

After the match we were taken to an open air cabaret on the edge of the forest, and a very happy evening was spent, the German club being proud of being the first Continental team to beat the Hammers.

FREIBURG (Germany)

Friburg

2 - 5  (Campbell, Watson)

18 May 1924

MONDAY 19th MAY

Our Friburg friends had apparently laid themselves out to give us a fine time. For on motor cars arrived at the hotel at 10:00 am, and the whole party, with a number of the Friburg officials, were taken for a circular drive of nearly 80 miles through some of the grandest scenery in the world. Passing Gunterstal, the main road took us to Fredrichof, a favourite holiday resort. Going by Kybfelsen, the highest peak of the range, and the old-world villages of Ebner, Karten and Himmelrasch, all in the valley with pine-covered mountains, each side of the road for a distance of 40 miles we reached a famous health resort called Lake Titisee; this is a splendid sheet of water over a mile above sea level. To arrive at Titisee the road winds like a snake up the mountains and at many points is on the edge of the cliffs, but if one felt timid at times when negotiating sharp curves, compensation was derived from the panorama of grandeur unfolded at every turn of the road.

Leaving Titisee, we proceeded to St. Marfgen, where lunch was served and after visiting points of interest we continued on to St. Peter, where a halt was made for our party to see the church, nestled in a small village among the mountains. It is almost impossible to describe the beauty of the interior – it leaves one thinking as to why such magnificent work was expended in such a small place.

Again boarding our cars, we started on the downward journey to Friburg, where we arrived after passing through more of this lovely country.

 

 

OFF TO SWITZERLAND

As we were booked to leave for Berne, Switzerland by the 6:00 pm train all had to pack their bags right away and proceed to the railway station, where we found a large number of persons assembled to give us a send-off, which made it almost impossible to think that only a few years had elapsed since our countries were fighting on the field of battle instead of the football field. The journey to the Swiss frontier only occupied an hour, and we were left with 30 minutes to get through the German and Swiss Customs and cross the town of Basil to the Federated Railways. The Customs’ officers passed us without trouble as soon as they were told we were a football team travelling to Berne. Taxis were obtained, but owing to some difficulty with the passport of a traveller who was between some of our players, there were several minutes’ delay. Arriving at the Swiss station, the change office had to be visited, with the result that 11 of our party missed the train.

Those left behind were just making up their minds that the evening would have to be spent in Basle, when they were informed that a special or excursion train would obtain a connection that would land them in Berne before the ordinary train. Thus, those who were left reached Berne first to tell the others when they came along that they had boarded the wrong train!

TUESDAY 20th MAY: THE SNOW-CLAD ALPS

The morning was bright and clear, and the view obtained from the terrace of the Parliament House was one of impressive grandeur – the lovely city with its background of hills, and the massive snow-clad Alps in the distance. Walks through the town to inspect points of interest, a raid for straw hats, and visits to the cathedral and beer-garden were made. The afternoon was spent quietly, and at 5 pm we were motored to the ground for the sixth game of the tour. Whether the purchasing of straw hats was unlucky or not, a lot of leg-pulling was indulged in, for just as the game commenced rain began to fall, and in a few minutes those of us who were in the grand stand witnessed the unusual spectacle of a football match in progress whilst forked lightning was flashing, thunder roaring, and there was a tropical deluge of rain and hailstones.

The referee stopped the play after a quarter of an hour, but a few minutes later a resumption was made, and then occurred one of the most farcical games of football ever seen by any of our party, as there was quite six inches of water nearly the whole length of one side of the playing pitch and a small lake in front of the goals, with the result that the ball was floating and water polo instead of football became the order. The game was completed with the Hammers winners by 1-0, Yews scoring the only goal. After the match the teams and officials dined with the Berne Club, and the meal was not finished until nearly midnight.

BERNE (Switzerland)

Berne

1 - 0 (Yews)  

20 May 1924

WEDNESDAY 21st MAY

Out at 6 am, to observe the spectacle of sunrise over the Alps, and a magnificent picture it was; a walk along the banks of the River Aar, and then back to the hotel for breakfast and packing in readiness to catch the mid-day train for Paris.

After breakfast some of us made the trip to the top of the hills by the funicular railway, and were rewarded with a magnificent view of the Alps with the sun shining brilliantly, whilst after a few minutes we were enveloped in the clouds. A walk around the top of the hill revealed to us some of Nature’s handiwork in the making, and we were pleased not to have missed the object lessons obtained by such a short and easy journey.

 

IN FRANCE

One o’clock saw us leaving Berne en route for Paris. Passing some hundreds of miles of beautiful kaleidoscope scenery, and such interesting places as Lake Neuchatel; we arrived at the frontier town of Pontarlier, where a visit had to be paid to the French Customs for inspection of luggage. The impression one gained in passing through the countryside towards Paris was that the German farming is far better than that of the French, as the appearance of the land and crops cannot compare in any respect with those in Germany. It was midnight when we arrived in Paris, and all retired after a tedious 13-hour journey.

 

THURSDAY 22nd MAY 

Breakfast over, some of our party motored to Versailles, and every one was unanimous that the visit was an incident in a lifetime – one to be remembered. The magnificent paintings depicting French history from early times, wonderful decorations and splendid halls – everything made a lasting impression upon one and all. Returning to Paris, lunch was taken, and then to the Stadium for our last match of the tour. We had been booked to meet the French International team, and eight of the players who turned out against us were in the team defeated by England last Saturday. The game was quite interesting, and eventually resulted in a win for France by two goals to one. Henderson, by sending the ball into his own goal, won the match for the Frenchmen.

FRIDAY 23rd MAY

Another fine day in prospect, and we were early astir. Visits were made to the Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe, Champs Elysees, Notre Dame, Town Hall, Place de la Concorde, The Louvre, Luxemburg Palace and other interesting places in the city. After lunch everyone was bent on shopping, and the obtaining of reparations for absent relatives and friends.

Dinner was taken at 7.pm, and one hour later the last stage of the tour was commenced. Leaving Paris at 8.45 o’clock, the party travelled via Dieppe-Newhaven, arriving at Victoria at 6 am on Saturday May 24th, completing a most successful round trip of nearly 3000 miles, with pleasant memories of every place visited by our party, and playing seven matches, five being won and two lost as follows:-

 

Saturday, May 10th. - West Ham 2 Cologne, 0.

Sunday, May 11th. - West Ham 6 Gladbach, 1.

Wednesday, May 14th. - West Ham 4 Mannheim, 0.

Saturday, May 17th. - West Ham 4 Frankfurt, 0.

Sunday, May 18th. - West Ham 2 Friburg, 5.

Tuesday, May 20th. - West Ham 1 Berne, 0.

Thursday, May 22nd. - West Ham 1 France, 2.

 

The visit to Germany, Switzerland and France will long be remembered, and in conclusion I would like to record the courtesy and attention paid to us by the officials of the German clubs, especially Mr. Stengel, of Cologne, Mr. Engels, and Charlie Gilraith, of Gladbach, Mr. Hermann Schoendube, of Frankfurt-on-Maine, and Sergeant W. Lecrerer, of the “Cologne Post.”

FRANCOIS (France)

Paris

1 - 2  (Yews)

22 May 1924

It is probable that never before has an English League Club played in front of such a critical crowd, as no less than twenty international teams were present, including those from America, Egypt, Holland, Czecho-Slovakia, Italy, Spain, Esthonia, Sweden, Turkey, Algeria, Greece, Yugoslavia, Austria and Hungary – all in Paris ready for the Olympic Tournament, which commences on Sunday next, the first game being Spain v. Italy. Previous to the start of the game George Kay placed a large wreath on the war memorial erected in the sports ground, this act being appreciated by the spectators. After the match we returned to the Hotel Moderne for dinner, the evening being filled by a visit to an international show, where we were entertained with a variety programme by first-class artistes in a manner quite different from anything seen in London.

GLASGOW CELTIC (Scotland)

Upton Park

2 - 2 (Gibbins, Moore)

10 April 1924

Hampson, Henderson, Blake F., Bishop, Kay, Cadwell, Edwards, Watson, Gibbins, Moore, Ruffell

SOUTHEND UNITED

Upton Park

2 - 0

20 April 1924

SLUG Programme

Other Matches Played at the Boleyn Ground

CLAPTON v. DULWICH : London Charity Cup Final

Upton Park

Date ?

? - ?

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR : Dockland Settlement

Upton Park

1 - 1 (Young [pen])

17 March 1924

PRACTICE MATCH

Upton Park

? - ?

?? August 1923

CHELSEA : Reserves

Away

? - ?

Date ?

MILLWALL : London Professional Charity Cup Final

The Den

0 - 2

8 October 1923

CLAPTON v. SOUTHEND UNITED : FA Cup (5th Qualifying Round)

Upton Park

1 December 1923

1 - 3  (? - Southend scorers : Goodwin 2, Davis)

Tourists at Friburg

Image courtesy of Simon Lord

Officials and Players on a trip to the Black Forest

NORWICH CITY : Norfolk & Norwich Hospital Cup

The Nest

4 - 3 (Watson 3, Campbell)

5 May 1924

Kaine, Henderson, Young, Bishop, Kay, Cadwell, Edwards, Watson, Campbell, Moore, Ruffell

 

MAIDSTONE : Reserves

Away

1 - 5

1 September 1923

GILLINGHAM : Reserves

Upton Park

2 - 0 (?)

15 December 1923

GILLINGHAM : Reserves

Away

3 - 1 (?)

5 January 1924

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR

Upton Park

1 - 1

23 February 1924

HAKOAH VIENNA (Austria-Hungary)

Upton Park

0 - 5

3 September 1923

FOLKSTONE "A" : Reserves

Away

0 - 1

23 February 1924

Kaine, Hodgson, Horler, Tresadern, Hebden, Hodges, Kelly, Fletcher, Barrett, Proctor, Thirlaway

 

Hampson, Henderson, Young, Bishop, Kay, Cadwell, Edwards, Collins, Campbell, Moore, Ruffell

Hufton, Henderson, Young, Carter, Kay, Mackesy, Kelly, Brown, Williams, Robinson, Ruffell

Season 1923-24 1922-23 Friendlies 1924-25 Friendlies

Hampson, Henderson, Young, Allen, Carter, Cadwell, Kelly, Brown, Barrett, Proctor, Richards

 

West Ham v Hakoah

Hakoah Vienna at Upton Park - George Carter and Albert Cadwell

ABERDARE 

Away

3 - 1 (Fletcher 2, Proctor)

17 September 1923

MAIDSTONE : Reserves

Upton Park

3 - 0  (?)

10 October 1923

CHELSEA : Reserves

Upton Park

4 - 1  (?)

1 November 1923

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR : Reserves

Upton Park

3 - 1  (?)

15 November 1923

LONDON UNIVERSITY : Reserves

Upton Park

7 - 1  (?)

15 November 1923

R.F.A. WOOLWICH : Reserves

Away

8 - 2 (?)

20 February 1924

LEICESTER CITY : Reserves

Upton Park

? - ?

20 April 1924

LEICESTER CITY : Reserves

Filbert Street

? - ?

21 April 1924

TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR : Reserves

White Hart Lane

? - ?

26 April 1924

WEST HAM BOYS v. WILLESDEN BOYS : Corinthian Shield (Final)

24_04_19 WH Boys v. Willesden Boys Corinthian Shie

Upton Park

(? - ?)

19 April 1924

 

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

24_04_26 Tottenham Hotspur v. WHU Friendly

Image courtesy of Nigel Turner

Hampson

Henderson

Young

Collins

Kay

Cadwell

Yews

Robinson

Watson

Moore

Ruffell

 

Kaine

Hebden

Young

Collins

Kay

Bishop

Yews

Watson

Campbell

Moore

Williams

 

Hampson

Henderson

Young

Bishop

Kay

Cadwell

Edwards

Watson

Campbell

Moore

Ruffell

 

Hampson

Henderson

Young

Bishop

Carter

Cadwell

Edwards

Watson

Campbell

Moore

Ruffell

 

Hampson

Hebden

Young

Carter

Kay

Collins

Yews

Robinson

Watson

Williams

Ruffell

 

Kaine

Henderson

Hebden

Carter

Kay

Cadwell

Yews

Robinson

Watson

Moore

Williams

 

.

Kaine

Henderson

Hebden

Collins

Kay

Cadwell

Yews

Robinson

Watson

Moore

Williams

 

WEST HAM BOYS v. EAST HAM BOYS : Corinthian Shield

Upton Park

14 February 1924

? - ?

24_05_08 Clapton v. Dulwich Hamlet London Charity